Uruguay, the Best of All Countries Great and Small

By Davies, Hunter | New Statesman (1996), December 5, 2011 | Go to article overview

Uruguay, the Best of All Countries Great and Small


Davies, Hunter, New Statesman (1996)


had never heard of that player who helped stuff Man City in the Uefa Champions League, scoring two goals for Napoli, which as good as ruined Man City's chances of progressing. Edinson Cavani? Hmm, the surname sounded Italian but his first name hinted of Anglo connections. Now that 1 look him up, I see he is 24 and has been with Napoli since 2010. In September, he scored a hat-trick against Milan. Comes from Uruguay. Should have guessed. What is it with Uruguay?

They are ranked fourth in the Fifa world rankings - which doesn't say a huge amount, as England have somehow crept in at five, after those boring wins against Spain and Sweden. This year, Uruguay won the Copa America - beating Paraguay in the final, held in Argentina, which was a triumph, especially when you realise how titchy Uruguay is. Its population is only 3.5 million - compared with Argentina's 40 million and Brazil's 192 million. Uruguay have 42,000 registered players to choose from, compared with 332,000 in Argentina and 2.1 million in Brazil. How do they do it ?

One of the factors is history. We, over here, like to think that we gave football to a grateful world, which is true in most senses, as we created the rules in 1863 and invented the idea of competitive leagues in 1888. But the other big event in the history of world football is the World Cup-which we couldn't be arsed to enter till 1950. The first World Cup was held in Uruguay in 1930. They won it and again in 1950 -beating Brazil, in Brazil - so they have won twice as many World Cups as England.

Before that, Uruguay won the gold for football at the Olympics in 1924 and 1928. And they were already dominant in the Copa America, which began in 1916. They won it that year and 14 other times since.

So, football has been part of their national DNA: what they do, what they have always been good at. It is their game.

However, being very small, the country has had lean spells, unlike a giant such as Brazil, which has consistently produced world-class players. In the 1990s, Uruguay twice failed to make the World Cup finals, in 1994 (as did England) and in 1998, and fell to 54 in the world rankings.

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