Gaining Access to Higher Education

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

Gaining Access to Higher Education


Byline: SARAH RICHARDSON

[bar] ONFIDENCE; culture; cash; other commitments -- there are many reasons why a potential undergraduate may dismiss the idea of pursuing a degree. Yet Newham College has developed a higher education faculty, Newham University Centre (NUC -- formerly University Centre Stratford), to give as many people as possible the opportunity to benefit from higher education.

Students come from very diverse cultures, and many do not have conventional educational backgrounds. Newham College is an open access institution, which means that all sections of the community are encouraged to study at the college, and all applicants will be offered a place on a suitable course. That place will be suitable to their needs and aspirations, and will be decided using objective criteria.

Students who are not ready for higher education will be offered a place on a course that will enable them to progress to higher education. Successful completion of a Level 3 course at Newham College will help the student gain a place on a higher education course at NUC or another higher education provider if they wish.

Dr David Arnaud, head of Newham University Centre, says: "We are a small-scale faculty, currently around 450 students, dedicated to providing a friendly atmosphere with lots of support and contact between lecturers and students.

The largest group any student is ever in is 50-60 students.

But most interaction with our lecturers is in much smaller groups such as seminars and one-to-one tutorials. This is a very different student experience than is often found in large universities where the individual can easily get lost.

"Our primary focus is on supporting students and effective teaching and learning. We have a dedicated student learning adviser and this semester -- given the challenging economic times students face -- we are going to engage an employability co-ordinator to help students prepare for employment."

Newham and the NUC welcome students with non-traditional backgrounds, including those who have not felt well served to date by education.

"We offer second chances for those willing to put in the work," says Dr Arnaud. "I myself only managed a D and E at A-level but graduated with a first-class degree and we believe that others can similarly develop given their hard work and our support."

NUC runs its degree programmes in collaboration with partner universities, including The Open University (OU). Newham College has institutional approval from the OU, which means that it is approved by The Open University as an appropriate organisation to offer higher education programmes leading to OU validated awards. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Gaining Access to Higher Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.