Let's Not Forget That Most Victims of Violent Crime Are Men, Not Women

Cape Times (South Africa), January 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

Let's Not Forget That Most Victims of Violent Crime Are Men, Not Women


Imagine that the Cape Times had published an article entitled "Look at the pictures and ask yourself: why whites?" Imagine that that article then told the gruesome stories of five "white" victims of violent crime in South Africa. Imagine, finally, that the byline of this article stated that its author would look at "some of the most notorious and brutal crimes that shook the province this year, all perpetrated by blacks".

Such an article would rightly cause outrage. It would be criticised for demonising "blacks" and for focusing only on "white" victims of crime, thereby ignoring the fact that "whites" constitute a minority of victims of violent crime.

How is it then that the Cape Times did publish an article entitled "Look at the pictures and ask yourself: why women and children?" with a byline indicating that "Tanya Farber looks at some of the most notorious and brutal crimes that shook the province this year, all perpetrated by men" ( December 29, 2011)?

This question will strike many as absurd. Violence against women and children, they will say, is a scourge - a grotesque feature of our and many other societies - and demands our urgent attention. This, they will say, is why there are campaigns working against "violence against women and children".

Violence against women and children is indeed a serious problem, and one that merits attention. However, what is routinely ignored is that with the exception of sexual violence, the victims of which are disproportionately female, it is men who are the overwhelming majority of victims of violent crime.

According to South African Police Service statistics for the 2009-2010 financial year, there were 16 834 murders in the country. Of these, 2 457 were women and 965 were children (of either sex). That means that about 80 percent of the victims of murder were adult males.

There were 17 410 attempted murders in the same year. This includes 3 008 adult female victims and 1 117 child victims. In other words, more than 75 percent of the victims of attempted murder were adult males.

In the category of "assault with intent to do grievous bodily harm", there were 12 062 child victims,62 143 adult female victims, and 131 088 adult male victims.

Nor is it only in South Africa that males constitute the overwhelming majority of the victims of (non-sexual) violence. It is a universal phenomenon.

What justifies the disproportionate concern for violence against women and children and the neglect of violence against men? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Let's Not Forget That Most Victims of Violent Crime Are Men, Not Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.