When All Is Taken Away

By Daly, Michael | Newsweek, January 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

When All Is Taken Away


Daly, Michael, Newsweek


Byline: Michael Daly

Two tragedies, one message of love, and 'acts of pure kindness.'

What does it take to survive the brutal death of one's children? How can a parent endure?

After a funeral unlike any witnessed at the century-old St. Thomas Church in Manhattan, mourners stood on Fifth Avenue early this month and wondered aloud how Madonna Badger had managed to function at all, much less step up to the lectern and speak so eloquently of the three young daughters who lay in coffins before her.

She had not been able to rescue her children from the Christmas-morning fire that swept through their Connecticut home, killing the three girls along with her parents. She had only been able to cry out "My babies! My babies!" as the firefighters tried to reach them.

But even in tragedy, she found a way to save her girls--by keeping them alive in the hearts of those who came to say goodbye. "This is going to be really hard," she told the mourners when she stepped up to the oak lectern carved with a likeness of Job. "But I feel very strongly, and the reason why I wanted to speak to you today is to let you know who my girls were ... I want you to remember my girls out loud to fight for them to never be forgotten."

Hers was a story of love for Lily, Sarah, and Grace. But there had to be more than love alone. "We can talk all day long about love, but love without service is not enough. Please keep our little girls in your hearts by showing your love with acts of pure kindness, by loving each other and finding a way to help each other every day."

She spoke these words fours days after Dr. William Petit told his late wife's family that he had gotten engaged--a remarkable symbol of his resilience four and a half years after he endured a loss as unimaginable as Badger's. In 2007, two monsters invaded the Connecticut doctor's home, bludgeoning and binding him before raping and strangling his wife, Jennifer Hawke-Petit, and sexually assaulting his 11-year-old daughter Michaela, then setting her and his 17-year-old daughter Hayley afire.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

When All Is Taken Away
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.