Commission for Gender Equality Must Begin to Deliver to SA Women

Cape Times (South Africa), January 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Commission for Gender Equality Must Begin to Deliver to SA Women


THIS week, Parliament holds public interviews to fill the long-vacant seats of commissioners in the Commission for Gender Equality (CGE).

The CGE has been in disarray for years and has failed to deliver on its mandate to promote gender equality. It is an organisation with a budget of R60 million and weighty powers vested in it by the constitution that should be used to advance the quality of life of women.

It is essential new commissioners are appointed with the vision, capacity and drive to turn the institution around and ensure that it delivers on its mandate to the people of SA.

Nearly 20 years after the first democratic elections, SA women face some of the highest levels of domestic and sexual violence against women found anywhere in the world. Women in SA are also more likely than men to be unemployed, earn less for similar work and encounter greater barriers to their career advancement.

Women also bear the brunt of poor service delivery and are disproportionately affected by the spread of HIV/Aids.

In short, there has been far too little progress towards achieving gender equality and ensuring that women in SA can access the rights guaranteed to them in the constitution and laid out in the laws of the land.

The accomplishments of the Public Protector over the past year serve as an important reminder of what a determined Chapter 9 institution like the CGE can achieve when it fully exercises its powers as an independent watchdog.

SA needs the CGE to be strong, proactive and fearless in the execution of its duties.

It needs its new commissioners to be inspired leaders in the struggle for gender equality.

The CGE's wide array of legal powers, including the power to subpoena any person, including government officials, and to initiate litigation in its own name, could be highly effective in advancing gender transformation in our country.

Instead, the CGE has been reticent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Commission for Gender Equality Must Begin to Deliver to SA Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.