New Israel Elections Are around the Corner: As of Now, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Is Poised for a Big Win

By Hazony, David | Moment, January-February 2012 | Go to article overview

New Israel Elections Are around the Corner: As of Now, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Is Poised for a Big Win


Hazony, David, Moment


Elections are in the air--and not just in the United States. In December, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called for early primaries in his Likud Party, a likely indicator that he may dissolve the Knesset sometime in 2012 and call a general election. The ball has begun to roll.

Some commentators will point to this move as proof of Netanyahu's weak hold on his conservative coalition. They are wrong. In the two decades since I moved to Israel, I've never seen a coalition so stable. In fact, the move shows Netanyahu's strength. In the Israeli system, it is always better to call elections than to have them foisted on you, to pick the optimal moment rather than scramble to get ready. Whoever makes the elections happen gets the jump on the campaign and looks like the one in charge. Even the rumor of elections creates a dynamic in which every party digs in on ideological issues, trying to appeal to prospective voters. So once the Prime Minister sends out the election vibe, it's usually just a matter of time.

A primer of likely political developments in 2012:

1. The demise of Kadima. It's been a fun ride, but Kadima's days as the main opposition party are over. The party that was founded on the strength of Ariel Sharon's personality, and his determination to withdraw from the Gaza Strip over his own Likud party's objections, found unexpected life after Sharon's departure for a simple reason: There are hundreds of thousands of Israelis on the left who, despite having abandoned the peace camp in light of the second intifada, nonetheless could never stomach voting for Likud. That was enough to give Kadima a huge mandate despite having no clear ideology, charismatic leadership, governing experience or (post-disengagement) clear policies.

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That grace period is over--thanks in part to the coalition tactics of Netanyahu. By bringing the Labor Party, then headed by Ehud Barak, into the government, Netanayahu effectively outflanked Kadima on the left, creating a pincer movement that left Kadima unable to offer a plausible alternative. Their fall will set the stage for:

2. The return of Labor as a viable governing party. The evisceration of Kadima was so thorough that it has had a radical, unintended consequence: the effective disenfranchisement of hundreds of thousands of left-leaning Israelis. For if the purpose of an opposition is to give voice (and therefore release) to whole parts of the country dissatisfied with government, in Israel there has been no such voice. The result: The eruption of a massive protest movement that filled the streets with tents, concerts and (frankly) a lot of fun and silliness throughout the summer. The Israeli social justice movement, in other words, was primarily an expression brought about by the lack of politicians speaking for left-leaning middle-class Israelis struggling to get by. …

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