John Arlidge Sits Down with Billionaire-Provocateur George Soros

By Arlidge, John | Newsweek, January 30, 2012 | Go to article overview
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John Arlidge Sits Down with Billionaire-Provocateur George Soros


Arlidge, John, Newsweek


Byline: John Arlidge

The situation is about as serious and difficult as I've experienced in my career.'

You know George Soros. He's the investor's investor--the man who still holds the record for making more money in a single day's trading than anyone. He pocketed $1 billion betting against the British pound on "Black Wednesday" in 1992, when sterling lost 20 percent of its value in less than 24 hours and crashed out of the European exchange-rate mechanism. No wonder Brits call him, with a mix of awe and annoyance, "the man who broke the Bank of England."

Soros doesn't make small bets on anything. Beyond the markets, he has plowed billions of dollars of his own money into promoting political freedom in Eastern Europe and other causes. He bet against the Bush White House, becoming a hate magnet for the right that persists to this day. So, as Soros and the world's movers once again converge on Davos, Switzerland, for the World Economic Forum this week, what is one of the world's highest-stakes economic gamblers betting on now?

He's not. For the first time in his 60-year career, Soros, now 81, admits he is not sure what to do. "It's very hard to know how you can be right, given the damage that was done during the boom years," Soros says. He won't discuss his portfolio, lest anyone think he's talking things down to make a buck. But people who know him well say he advocates making long-term stock picks with solid companies, avoiding gold--"the ultimate bubble"--and, mainly, holding cash.

He's not even doing the one thing that you would expect from a man who knows a crippled currency when he sees one: shorting the euro, and perhaps even the U.S. dollar, to hell. Quite the reverse. He backs the beleaguered euro, publicly urging European leaders to do whatever it takes to ensure its survival. "The euro must survive because the alternative--a breakup--would cause a meltdown that Europe, the world, can't afford." He has bought about $2 billion in European bonds, mainly Italian, from MF Global Holdings Ltd., the securities firm run by former Goldman Sachs head Jon Corzine that filed for bankruptcy protection last October.

Has the great short seller gone soft? Well, yes. Sitting in his 33rd-floor corner office high above Seventh Avenue in New York, preparing for his trip to Davos, he is more concerned with surviving than staying rich. "At times like these, survival is the most important thing," he says, peering through his owlish glasses and brushing wisps of gray hair off his forehead. He doesn't just mean it's time to protect your assets. He means it's time to stave off disaster. As he sees it, the world faces one of the most dangerous periods of modern history--a period of "evil." Europe is confronting a descent into chaos and conflict. In America he predicts riots on the streets that will lead to a brutal clampdown that will dramatically curtail civil liberties. The global economic system could even collapse altogether.

"I am not here to cheer you up. The situation is about as serious and difficult as I've experienced in my career," Soros tells Newsweek. "We are facing an extremely difficult time, comparable in many ways to the 1930s, the Great Depression. We are facing now a general retrenchment in the developed world, which threatens to put us in a decade of more stagnation, or worse. The best-case scenario is a deflationary environment. The worst-case scenario is a collapse of the financial system."

Soros's warning is based as much on his own extraordinary personal history as on his gut instinct for market booms and busts. "I did survive a personally much more threatening situation, so it is emotional, as well as rational," he acknowledges. Soros was just 13 when Nazi soldiers invaded and occupied his native Hungary in March 1944. In only eight weeks, almost half a million Hungarian Jews were deported, many to Auschwitz. He saw bodies of Jews, and the Christians who helped them, swinging from lampposts, their skulls crushed.

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John Arlidge Sits Down with Billionaire-Provocateur George Soros
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