Facilities That Fit the College's Long-Term Mission

By Obendorf, Kay | Human Ecology, Fall 2011 | Go to article overview

Facilities That Fit the College's Long-Term Mission


Obendorf, Kay, Human Ecology


Building spaces that successfully advance the student-centered mission of the College of Human Ecology requires a unique approach to facilities planning. By accepting the challenge to develop spaces to support the growth of innovative research in fields from neuroscience to historical and contemporary fashion, our facilities team works closely with the faculty, staff, and students to create spaces that serve the college and the broader Cornell community.

In 1990, the college leadership began work on a comprehensive facilities plan that has contributed greatly to the college's long-term vision to lead in multidisciplinary, field-based research, innovative teaching, and outreach and extension efforts.

Since that time, new construction, renovations, and technology upgrades in the college's long-time home, Martha Van Rensselaer (MVR) Hall, and Savage Hall, a hub for the Division of Nutritional Sciences, aim to keep pace with the growth of our research and teaching programs.

The addition of the new Human Ecology Building (nearly 89,000 sq. ft.) this year replaces the "23 equivalent amount of space lost when the MVR North Building, in the same location, was determined to be unsound and closed in 2001. Still, the addition of the new building is just one large milestone in an ongoing series of renovations and updates to college buildings anticipated in the facilities master plan that guides the growth of our facilities. Even before the loss of MVR North, it was clear that growing expectations for more space and technology required a forward - looking philosophy that guarantees that our facilities meet the evolving needs of our college.

The success of our research and teaching programs is due to our incredibly ingenious faculty members, who seek to collaborate around key issues and lead research in many new directions. Our facilities plan will continue to involve faculty members and students in a way that ensures that our facilities keep pace with their innovation and scholarship. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Facilities That Fit the College's Long-Term Mission
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.