We Wanted to Get out of Place of Mass Murder; INTERNATIONAL Holocaust Memorial Day in Coventry on January 27 - the Day the Russians Liberated Auschwitz Concentration Camp in 1945 - Brought Back Unforgettable Memories for Telegraph Reader Peter Surtees. Peter, of Sutton Avenue, Eastern Green, Coventry, Decided to Write about His Experiences Visiting Auswitz Concentration Camp Back in 1993 with His Wife Pat

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), February 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

We Wanted to Get out of Place of Mass Murder; INTERNATIONAL Holocaust Memorial Day in Coventry on January 27 - the Day the Russians Liberated Auschwitz Concentration Camp in 1945 - Brought Back Unforgettable Memories for Telegraph Reader Peter Surtees. Peter, of Sutton Avenue, Eastern Green, Coventry, Decided to Write about His Experiences Visiting Auswitz Concentration Camp Back in 1993 with His Wife Pat


Byline: Peter Surtees

WHILE driving towards The Ukraine and travelling through Poland, along with my wife, we saw a sign to the little village of Auschwitz or Oswiecim in Polish.

Having read many books and seen so many old black and white documentary films about the concentration camps, we decided that as we were so near, we would pay a short visit to see if it was as bad as it was portrayed.

Finding the actual camp wasn't difficult and we were able to park inside alongside other vehicles including coaches. The feeling we got was that we were at some kind of attraction; in fact 1.3 million people visit there every year. It soon changed when we passed through the barbed wire and electrified fences into the actual compound.

Still there above the gates was the cynical reminder; 'Arbeit Macht Frei' or work makes you free. Nothing could have been farther than the truth.

The actual buildings were built before the war and the camp was used by the Polish Army. Inside the larger building were huge glass fronted display cabinets about the size of big shop windows and about ten feet deep reaching to the roof. There were about eight or ten of these containers and each one was full to the roof with spectacles, different types of brushes, artificial limbs, legs arms etc.

Then there was a collection of human hair, suitcases and travel bags including one which belonged to Anne Frank's father. The collection which disturbed us the most was one dedicated to children's toys. Dollies, prams, lots of soft toys, baby's rattles and bottles with well hugged and loved teddies which no more would feel the tender embraces and goodnight cuddles of their unfortunate little owners.

By now we had both had enough and wanted to get out of the building, but everywhere there were photos and reminders of the terrible things that went on here.

Starting to feel very upset and with tears welling in our eyes, we wondered if there was anything else left in this terrible place to shock us. It wasn't very long before we were to find out. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

We Wanted to Get out of Place of Mass Murder; INTERNATIONAL Holocaust Memorial Day in Coventry on January 27 - the Day the Russians Liberated Auschwitz Concentration Camp in 1945 - Brought Back Unforgettable Memories for Telegraph Reader Peter Surtees. Peter, of Sutton Avenue, Eastern Green, Coventry, Decided to Write about His Experiences Visiting Auswitz Concentration Camp Back in 1993 with His Wife Pat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.