Growth Is Good, but Not Enough to Improve Nutrition

By Ecker, Olivier; Breisinger, Clemens et al. | International Trade Forum, July-September 2011 | Go to article overview

Growth Is Good, but Not Enough to Improve Nutrition


Ecker, Olivier, Breisinger, Clemens, Pauw, Karl, International Trade Forum


Growth--whether driven by the agriculture or non-agriculture sectors--is insufficient to address child malnutrition and reduce micronutrient malnutrition. Strategic investments and special programmes are needed in the complementary sectors of health and education.

Cross-country analyses have been conducted to explore the general relationship between growth and malnutrition in the process of development. Complementary case studies of an agriculture-based economy (Malawi) and an oil-based economy (Yemen) assess the impacts of alternative policies on growth and nutrition outcomes under a range of scenarios.

Results and associated policy implications

Agricultural or non-agricultural growth can be better for improving nutrition depending on the country's economic structure and the characteristics of its malnourished people. In Malawi, agriculture has a strong potential to contribute to the reduction of malnutrition. This outcome holds for most agriculture-based economies, and particularly those in which poor people are disproportionately found in the agricultural sector. Nutrition outcomes improve not only among rural households, but also among urban ones, mainly through reduced food prices and economic linkage effects that increase real incomes. In Yemen, growth led by the industry and service sectors is more beneficial for improving nutrition outcomes than agriculture growth as the majority of the population draws its income from non-agricultural activities. In addition, most foods--especially staples--are imported, so the net consumer benefit accruing from the local price effect of agricultural productivity growth is low.

The role of growth in improving nutrition shifts during the development process. Comparisons between a bread-based agricultural growth and a baseline scenario (in which agricultural growth is concentrated in the large maize sector) in the Malawian study reveal that calorie and micronutrient deficiencies become less responsive to growth as prevalence rates decline. Further reductions require economic diversification; thus, the structure of growth across the whole economy and within the sectors is important for determining nutritional outcomes.

Neither agricultural growth nor nonagricultural growth is sufficient to improve child nutrition and reduce micronutrient malnutrition as a whole. Cross-country differences are more pronounced for the relationships between growth and child malnutrition than they are for the relationships between growth and undernourishment. Non-income related factors (such as information and knowledge) and individual health and healthcare seem to matter more in reducing child malnutrition than in reducing undernourishment. Even with decisive policy reform in Yemen, resulting in rapid growth acceleration, child malnutrition remains at unacceptably high levels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Growth Is Good, but Not Enough to Improve Nutrition
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.