Georgia Urged to Invest in Education, Health Care; President of the State's Medical College Wants a Workforce That's More Fit

By Jones, Walter C. | The Florida Times Union, January 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Georgia Urged to Invest in Education, Health Care; President of the State's Medical College Wants a Workforce That's More Fit


Jones, Walter C., The Florida Times Union


Byline: Walter C. Jones

ATLANTA | Georgia could give its economy a shot in the arm by increasing its spending on education, health insurance and research, the president of the state's medical college said Friday.

Ricardo Azziz, president of Georgia Health Sciences University, said policymakers don't often talk of social services as economic-development programs but they should. Even Medicaid, the health-insurance program for the poor, brings money to a community that circulates in that local economy, he said.

"At the end of the day, we know that if you have health insurance, your health care and your health improve," he said. "If your workforce is healthier, then prospective employers will be hiring healthier people."

On the other hand, the uninsured are an economic drag, he said.

"There is this fallacy that somehow the uninsured do not affect 'my life,'" he said. "... They cost money to treat. They cost five times as much as if you had provided coverage."

His comments came at a conference on the state budget sponsored by the Atlanta think tank Georgia Budget and Policy Institute.

While GHSU has a greater than $2 billion impact on the state's economy, it can't attract more researchers, for example, without adequate taxpayer money to invest in infrastructure, he said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Georgia Urged to Invest in Education, Health Care; President of the State's Medical College Wants a Workforce That's More Fit
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.