Research Highlights Testing That May Lessen Animal Use; SWANSEA UNIVERSITY IN JOINT STUDY ON NEW METHODS

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Research Highlights Testing That May Lessen Animal Use; SWANSEA UNIVERSITY IN JOINT STUDY ON NEW METHODS


Byline: ROBIN TURNER

ANIMAL welfare groups have welcomed a major new research project into ways of testing for cancer-causing substances in everyday chemicals and cosmetics without using laboratory animals.

Swansea University's Institute of Life Science is working with Brunel University to develop testing methods based on how human - not animal - cells are affected by certain substances.

They believe it will substantially reduce animal testing. Screening of chemicals used in the cosmetic, drug, agrochemical, and consumer products industries for potentially cancer-causing ingredients (carcinogenicity testing) uses large numbers of animals.

It can involve up to 800 mice or rats for each substance, with about 12,500 animals used annually in Great Britain.

The European Cosmetics Association says five billion cosmetic products are bought by 380 million consumers across Europe each year.

EU legislation requires that each product sold is safe to humans.

For years this was done by testing on thousands of animals but under pressure from groups such as the RSPCA and others, various restrictions and bans have gradually been introduced.

The EU Cosmetics Directive calls for a ban on animal testing of all cosmetic ingredients by 2013.

Now, Professor Gareth Jenkins and his Swansea-based team with colleagues in Brunel have been awarded a pounds 900,000 grant by the National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs).

Their aim is to find methods for assessing cancer risks in chemicals contained in cosmetics such as eye shadow and lipstick and other products without using animals.

Professor Jenkins plans to study how certain chemicals interrupt communication of human cells, possibly leading to cancer.

He will combine the information with currently available data to provide a better prediction of which chemicals are likely to be carcinogens.

The study is being done in collaboration with diagnostics and pharmaceutical giants Roche and GE Healthcare.

Professor Jenkins said: "This grant complements the work into animal replacement strategies already under way within the group I lead at the Institute of Life Science.

"Together, these efforts will help in designing better testing strategies to assess carcinogenicity without the need to use animals while at the same time safeguarding against human exposure to harmful chemicals.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Research Highlights Testing That May Lessen Animal Use; SWANSEA UNIVERSITY IN JOINT STUDY ON NEW METHODS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?