Inside the Ring

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

Inside the Ring


Byline: Bill Gertz, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

AIR SEA BATTLE BUDGET

The Pentagon's plan to shift the focus of U.S. military forces to Asia after disengagement in Iraq and Afghanistan got mixed support in the defense budget request released this week.

One significant indicator of budget support for the Air Sea Battle Concept unveiled in November is a plan to deploy Navy littoral combat ships (LCS) to Singapore.

The new LCSs are among the Navy's most advanced warships, designed to fight close to shores against what the military calls anti-access and asymmetric threats in those waters.

Deploying up to three of the new warships in Singapore is yet another message to China that the United States and its allies will not allow Beijing to seize control over the entire, resource-rich South China Sea.

China has privately called the sea its driveway and is moving its advanced naval forces, including ships, aircraft and submarines, into the region.

The Pentagon announced in November that it would deploy 2,500 Marines to a base on the northern tip of Australia, close to the South China Sea.

Another indicator of support for Air Sea Battle is the Pentagon's decision to keep 11 aircraft-carrier strike groups after considering going down to 10.

The budget also preserves funds for U.S. bombers and cruise-missile upgrades on submarines.

Despite those efforts, the Navy is retiring nine warships used in carrier strike groups and amphibious operations. The Pentagon budget also would kill plans to build 16 more warships by 2017.

Additionally, the budget slashed spending on mobility aircraft needed for power projection as part of Air Sea Battle.

DEMPSEY'S CHINA VALENTINE

President Obama and his top aides this week avoided all public discussion of the dangers posed by China's growing economic and military power during the visit of Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping.

Vice President Joseph R. Biden, who recently took the lead on U.S.-China policy from the State Department and other agencies, said during a meeting with Mr. Xi on Tuesday, We believe that a rising China is a positive development, not only for China but also for the United States and the world.

Mr. Biden didn't say why, but, in remarks before the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, he suggested there had been progress on currency and trade concerns, such as rampant intellectual property theft.

China's propaganda theme for the Xi visit was that the United States needs to build trust with the world's most populous, communist-ruled state.

No mention was made by Mr. Obama, Mr. Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton or Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta of China's continuing problematic activities that have raised concerns within the defense and intelligence communities.

Among the specific issues are continuing arms proliferation by China to rogue regimes such as Iran, Syria and North Korea and support for Syria's regime which has engaged in a bloody crackdown that has claimed the lives of thousands of civilians.

China's military buildup continues apace and was not mentioned in public by any senior administration official. The worries include China's anti-satellite missile systems that can cripple U. …

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