Things That Make Obama Angry in Park City, Utah; Confessions of a Small Business Owner on a 'Working Vacation'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

Things That Make Obama Angry in Park City, Utah; Confessions of a Small Business Owner on a 'Working Vacation'


Byline: Wayne Allyn Root, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

I just returned from a working vacation at my Park City, Utah, vacation home. As I was sitting on the plane reading the newspaper, I noticed that President Obama's new 2013 budget is out, and it's chock full of $1.5 trillion in tax increases on the wealthy. Some people never learn.

Suddenly, I realized that just about everything I do in Park City makes Mr. Obama and his leftist cabal angry. My vacation experience is proof positive that the president understands nothing about economics or creating jobs.

First, Mr. Obama would be angry to hear I own a vacation home in a beautiful place like Park City. I can hear Mr. Obama now: What right does Wayne Root have to possess such wealth while there are so many poor among us?

A couple thousand years ago, Jesus said, The poor will always be among us. Because of liberals like Mr. Obama, nothing has changed. Rather than creating an environment to encourage ambition, personal growth and attempts at higher education or learning a valuable trade, Mr. Obama gives the poor just enough handouts and entitlements to kill their desire and keep them poor, dependent on government and voting Democratic.

I am sure Mr. Obama would be angry to hear I think I earned my vacation home. He is much more familiar and comfortable with people (generally his voters) getting something for nothing: welfare, food stamps, tax credits, housing allowances, stimulus, bailouts, school meals, health care, education, cellphone minutes. Personal responsibility and earning anything without government help are clearly foreign concepts to our president.

In the real world, it often takes 20 years (or longer) to achieve overnight success. I dreamed about, planned and worked like a dog for more than 20 years, risking my own money on a dozen different businesses, to earn the down payment on that vacation home.

I'm sure Mr. Obama also gets angry at the mere mention of my working vacation. Since he has never run a business, he would never understand this concept. He works for government, where the idea of a working vacation is a labor violation. But as a business owner, my business responsibilities don't stop just because I'm away. On a typical vacation day, I work about 10 to 12 hours, leaving enough time for 3 hours of skiing. That's the only difference between my normal 16-hour workdays at home and my vacations. But I'm not unique or special. Many business owners have a similar schedule.

Mr. Obama loves to paint business owners as greedy. He gets angry when we talk about the jobs we create with our 16-hour workdays, working vacations and incredible financial risks taken with our own money.

People like me don't rely on government. We rely on ourselves. Government only gets in the way and steals our money, calling it income redistribution. …

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