Terps' Edsall Personifies a Backward Landscape

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

Terps' Edsall Personifies a Backward Landscape


Byline: Dan Daly, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

College athletics is sashaying toward a tipping point. I say sashaying because it suggests a certain obliviousness, a lack of self-awareness, and the folks in college sports have always scored high in those particular categories. High enough to qualify for an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship.

The latest athletic figure to move the needle in the direction of Armageddon is none other than Randy Edsall, Maryland football's answer to George S. Patton. (Minus the winning, I mean.) Since taking over the Terps a year ago, Edsall has been losing players the way most men his age lose hair. Three more parted ways with the program this week, including a quarterback, Danny O'Brien, who was the ACC's 2010 Rookie of the Year.

There's nothing surprising about O'Brien's decision to transfer. It was expected after Edsall installed an offense that wasn't especially Danny-friendly - and then benched him in favor of C.J. Brown, whose mobility better suited the system's needs. What is surprising is the report in The Washington Post that Edsall, before he signed off on it, stipulated that O'Brien couldn't take his arm to Vanderbilt, an SEC school that isn't on any of Maryland's future schedules.

The Commodores' coach, of course, is James Franklin, who at one point was Ralph Friedgen's designated successor in College Park - and who had a lot to do with O'Brien coming to Maryland. Inasmuch as Danny has only two years of eligibility left, Vandy would make perfect sense for him. He could hit the ground throwing there (and have a level of security, because of his past association with Franklin, he wouldn't have anywhere else).But Edsall, heavy-handed as always, won't allow it - and won't, either, for the two other recent transfers, offensive tackle Max Garcia and linebacker Mario Rowson. When Comcast SportsNet's Chick Hernandez pressed him on the issue, the coach said, Usually what'll end up happening is there's gonna be schools on there that you might compete against, or if there's things that you feel might have taken place, you might put schools on that [prohibited] list. So we have that prerogative to put those schools on the list. The players have the prerogative that if they want to appeal that, that they can appeal that as well. …

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