Geographies of Race in the American South: The Continuing Legacies of Jim Crow Segregation

By Inwood, Joshua F. J. | Southeastern Geographer, Winter 2011 | Go to article overview

Geographies of Race in the American South: The Continuing Legacies of Jim Crow Segregation


Inwood, Joshua F. J., Southeastern Geographer


The modern study of the American South has undergone a decade long resurgence in Geography and has come to be defined by questions of inequality and social justice. This resurgence represents an innovative approach to geographic scholarship, the outlines of which, contribute to a broadly theorized social justice/critical geographic engagement. Building upon this foundation this paper incorporates recent methodological and intellectual engagements with the American South through a focus on the 1901 Alabama State Constitution in an effort to outline scholarship grounded in social justice. The 1901 Constitution created the legal justification for the segregation of the races and was the product of white supremacist ideology. This in itself is unremarkable. Almost all state constitutions in the South were written under similar circumstances. Instead what makes the Alabama State Constitution an interesting case study is the fact that it was never rewritten. Thus the Alabama Constitution is an example of how the legacy of Jim Crow Segregation, and the white supremacy that formed a foundation for larger political, social, and economic inequality, continues to haunt the landscapes of the American South. Finally this paper is an opportunity to think about the broader legacies of inequality in the U.S. South and how legacies of displacement and racial segregation continue to operate long after the last vestiges of segregation were supposedly torn down.

El estudio moderno del Sur de los Estados Unidas ha experimentado un resurgimiento en la geografia a lo largo de una decada, y ha llegado a ser definido por interrogantes sobre desigualdad y justicia social. Este resurgimiento representa un enfoque innovador para la disciplina geografica, de cual las bases, contribuyen a los ampliamente teorizados jasticia social / acercamiento geogrdfico critico. A partir de estu base, el presente documento incorpora acercamientos metodologicos e intelectuales recientes con el Sur de los Estados Unidos a traves de un enfoque en la Constitucion del Estado de Alabama de 1901, en un esfuerzo por esbozar la actividad academica basada en la justicia social. La Constitucion de 1901 creo la justificacion legal para la segregacion de las razas, y fue el producto de la ideologia de la supremacfa blanca. Esta en si mismo es irrelevante. Casi todas las constituciones de los estados del sur fueron escritas en circunstancias similares. En cambio, lo que hace la Constitacion del Estado de Alabama un estudio de caso interesante es el hecho de que nunca se volvio a escribir. Por lo tanto, la Constitucion de Alabama es un ejemplo de como el legado de la segregacion de Jim Crow, y la supremacia blanca que dieron paso a una mayor desigualdad politica, social, y economica, sigue presente en los paisajes del Sur de los Estados Unidos. Finalmente, este trabajo es una oportunidad para pensar acerca de los legados generales de la desigualdad en el Sur de los Estados Unidos, y como el legado del des plazamiento y la segregacion racial siguen funcionando mucho tiempo despues de que los ultimos vestigios de la segregacion fueron supuestamente eliminados.

KEY WORDS: Racism, Segregation, American South, Critical Geography

**********

Any engagement with the U.S. South must recognize the painful geographies of displacement and dislocation that permeate the region's history. The forced exile of First Peoples from native lands, chattel slavery and the imposition of Jim Crow Segregation have left indelible marks on the landscape and continue to inform political, economic and social structures in the region (Winders 2005; Waft 2007; Alderman and Campbell 2008; Inwood 2008, 2009; Schein 2009). However as the fiftieth anniversary issue of the Southeastern Geographer points out academics in general, and geographers specifically, ignored the implications of these legacies for the region and the wider meaning for social justice and inequality (Tobin and Brinkman 2010, p 4). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Geographies of Race in the American South: The Continuing Legacies of Jim Crow Segregation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.