Disclosing the Abortion-Suicide Association; It's Time to Lift the Veil on Hidden Health Risks of Terminating Pregnancy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Disclosing the Abortion-Suicide Association; It's Time to Lift the Veil on Hidden Health Risks of Terminating Pregnancy


Byline: Clarke Forsythe and Mailee Smith, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

All 11 active judges of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit in St. Louis re- cently heard one of the most important abortion cases in the federal courts today. The case, Planned Parenthood v. Rounds, involves a South Dakota statute requiring informed consent before a woman undergoes an abortion. While many in the media have focused on the controversies surrounding President Obama's health care law, this case actually is one of the most significant events on the life issue today.

The hearing focused on what the courts have called the suicide advisory : the statute's requirement that abortion providers give patients a description of all known medical risks of the procedure and statistically significant risk factors .. including . depression [and] increased risk of suicide ideation and suicide.

This case is the latest example of how the lower federal courts repeatedly have tied up reasonable abortion regulations for years, preventing the regulations from taking effect, even when there is direct language from prior Supreme Court decisions supporting the purpose of the law.

The South Dakota law has been bottled up in the courts since it was enacted in 2005 and Planned Parenthood filed suit to block its implementation. In 1992, the Supreme Court reaffirmed that the states have "a substantial governmental interest justifying a requirement that a woman be apprised of the health risks of abortion and childbirth. .. It

cannot be questioned that psychological well-being is a facet of health .. In attempting to ensure that a woman apprehend the full consequences of her decision, the State furthers the legitimate purpose of reducing the risk that a woman may elect an

abortion, only to discover later, with devastating psychological consequences, that her decision was not fully informed If the information the State requires to be made available to the woman is truthful and not misleading, the requirement may be permissible."

In 2007, the Supreme Court made it more explicit in its latest abortion case: Whether to have an abortion requires a difficult and painful moral decision. While we find no reliable data to measure the phenomenon, it seems unexceptionable to conclude some women come to regret their choice to abort. .. Severe depression and loss of esteem can follow .. The State has an interest in ensuring so grave a choice is well informed

The court also reiterated that state and federal legislatures [have been given] wide discretion to pass legislation in areas where there is medical and scientific uncertainty.

That gap has largely been filled. In the past decade, a growing number of international medical studies have provided important new data.

The South Dakota statute does not mention or require any statement of causation (that abortion causes suicide). Instead, the statute requires a description of the increased risk of suicide after abortion, and that is what the medical studies address.

Americans United for Life filed the lead amicus brief on the documented medical evidence demonstrating the association between abortion and suicide, a brief that was resubmitted at the request of the court in December. The brief was filed on behalf of Christian Medical & Dental Associations, American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Catholic Medical Association, Physicians for Life, and National Association of Pro-Life Nurses.

Numerous peer-reviewed medical studies have found an association between abortion and suicide. Many others have found an association between induced abortion and depression, which is a major risk factor for suicide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Disclosing the Abortion-Suicide Association; It's Time to Lift the Veil on Hidden Health Risks of Terminating Pregnancy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.