Wells Suffers Setback in Force-Placed Case

By Horwitz, Jeff | American Banker, February 23, 2012 | Go to article overview
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Wells Suffers Setback in Force-Placed Case


Horwitz, Jeff, American Banker


Byline: Jeff Horwitz

A federal judge has granted class action status to plaintiffs in a much-watched force-placed insurance case against Wells Fargo & Co. and QBE Insurance Inc., opening the door to high-stakes litigation over alleged industry kickbacks.

The Tuesday ruling in Williams v. Wells Fargo et al by Judge Robert Scola, Jr. of U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Florida reinforces banks' vulnerability to legal attacks over their purchase of so-called forced-placed insurance on behalf of borrowers whose homeowner policies have lapsed.

Force-placed hazard insurance is designed to protect creditors in the event that an uninsured borrower's property is damaged. Mortgage contracts typically entitle banks to purchase such policies on behalf of homeowners who fail to maintain hazard coverage themselves and to pass on to them the cost of the coverage.

The Florida suit accuses does not take issue with the cost of such policies directly but instead accuses Wells and QBE of inflating the cost of such coverage by secretly paying themselves unearned commissions.

Scola cited evidence that the activities of Wells and QBE, an Australian insurer that administers Wells' force-placed insurance program, amounted to unjust enrichment and a breach of good faith. In a sometimes harshly worded opinion, Judge Scola accused the bank of threatening to retaliate against the 20,000 homeowners eligible to become class members in the Florida litigation.

"Wells Fargo has unabashedly set out its threats to retaliate against any homeowner seeking to avoid alleged excessive and inflated force-placed insurance premiums," Scola wrote. The judge added that he intends to prevent the bank from "establishing post-litigation, vindictive business practices."

For Wells and QBE the stakes are large, with more than $50 million in premiums at issue in Florida alone. Evidence introduced into the public record in the case could result in further headaches at a time when banks force-placed insurance practices face significant scrutiny. New York State's Department of Financial Services has sent out numerous subpoenas to banks and insurers as part of an ongoing investigation, and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency has also expressed interest in force-placed market.

QBE pays out 40% of total force-placed premiums as commission to its subsidiaries and Wells Fargo, the Florida plaintiffs charge. And only 7.6 cents of every dollar of premium revenue QBE collects goes to paying claims, according to a plaintiffs' analysis based on QBE data. Such a low payout ratio would be regarded as unacceptable in most states. Guidelines laid out by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners instruct insurers to aim for a payout of 60%.

Attorneys for the plaintiffs also attacked how QBE sets its rates. Camley Delach served as QBE's lone actuary for force-place policies written on behalf of Wells Fargo in Florida, according to a deposition discussed at the class certification. It was her job to gauge the financial risks the underwriter faced. But Delach said in a deposition that she works from her Pennsylvania home, performs no actuarial work to determine QBE's prices, and has "no idea" why QBE prices its policies the way it does.

"It is not necessary for someone to be an actuary to critique this procedure," Judge Scola wrote in his opinion certifying the plaintiff class.

The information about the Wells and QBE practices was presented in open court on February 9. American Banker obtained the case files when they were originally posted to PACER, an online database of federal court records.

Wells Fargo and QBE accused plaintiffs attorneys of "misconduct" for bringing the information into a public forum. "Defendants have done everything within their control to protect the confidentiality of their business information," Wells and QBE stated.

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Wells Suffers Setback in Force-Placed Case
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