National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) Unveils Online Tool to Share Intelligence and Assist Law Enforcement

The FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, February 2012 | Go to article overview

National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) Unveils Online Tool to Share Intelligence and Assist Law Enforcement


The burden on gang investigators and analysts to comprehend the full nature of the threat posed by gangs to their communities has expanded and become increasingly complex. Gangs are more adaptable and sophisticated, employ new and advanced technology to facilitate criminal activity to avoid law enforcement scrutiny, enhance their criminal operations, and connect with other gang members, criminal organizations, and potential recruits nationwide and even worldwide.

The National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) is the only Department of Justice entity tasked with collecting, analyzing, and producing gang intelligence products to support federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies. On a daily basis, it assists with regional and national threat assessments; geo-spatial analysis and mapping projects; identification of gang signs, symbols, and tattoos; analytical support for specific gang-related investigations; strategic and tactical intelligence reports; and training.

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Striving to fulfill that mission in a fast-paced information age, NGIC has unveiled NGIC Online, an information system with Web-based tools designed for researching gang-related intelligence. NGIC Online serves as an Internet extension of the center, located near the Nation's Capital, which houses intelligence analysts from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives; Federal Bureau of Prisons; Drug Enforcement Agency; Department of Homeland Security; Department of Defense; Federal Bureau of Investigation; and the U.S. Marshals Service. This system is accessible through Law Enforcement Online (LEO), a free resource available to law enforcement throughout the country. …

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National Gang Intelligence Center (NGIC) Unveils Online Tool to Share Intelligence and Assist Law Enforcement
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