Underground Railroad: Escape from Slavery

By Forman, Cyrus | Afro-Americans in New York Life and History, January 2012 | Go to article overview

Underground Railroad: Escape from Slavery


Forman, Cyrus, Afro-Americans in New York Life and History


Underground Railroad: Escape From Slavery, http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/bhistory/underground_railroad/. Created and maintained by Scholastic, Inc. Reviewed September-November, 2010.

This interactive website, created by the children's book publisher, Scholastic. Inc. aims to educate elementary and middles school students about the experience of freedom seekers who used the Underground Railroad to end their enslavement. Designed as an experiential, educational simulation, users of this site are cast as an enslaved person in the antebellum period who escapes from slavery and utilizes the underground railroad to secure their freedom. This storyline of this simulation is augmented with short, primary-source based information about the underground railroad grouped according to the following themes: On the Plantation, Escape! Reaching Safety, Reaching Freedom, and Tell The Story. Interspersed amongst these vignettes are extensive activities that appear to be envisioned as possible enrichment activities to be used by teachers and students.

Though this website does not break any new ground, it does an admirable job of describing the difficult choices that freedom seekers faced, the reality of enslaved life in the United States, and how abolitionist sentiment helped create the American civil war, while not succumbing. The creators of this site were also clearly aware that the nineteenth century milieu is not one that students are intimately familiar with, and so they have taken great care to illustrate the differences between that time and our own, all within an intricate but visually clean interface. Unfortunately, after constructing a useful interface, the authors concentrated on the familiar Underground Railroad narrative, leaving out the story of those who fled south to Canada, Florida, and the West Indies out their storyline.

The manner in which this website utilizes primary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Underground Railroad: Escape from Slavery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.