Art Notes

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

Art Notes


Byline: The Register-Guard

Museum of Unfine Art to throw party for its 10th anniversary

Eugene's Museum of Unfine Art and Record Store, 537 Willamette St., celebrates its 10th anniversary on Wednesday with a reception from 5:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m.

An open exhibit titled "Your Favorite Piece" with work by dozens of local artists will be shown at the storefront gallery through January. A no-cover party follows the reception at Cowfish Dance Club, 62 W. Broadway, with pizza courtesy of the gallery.

In 10 years, says owner Shawn Mediaclast, the gallery, record store and smoke shop has exhibited work by more than 1,000 local artists.

OPUS VII and New Zone Gallery plan First Friday events

OPUS VII, 22 W. Seventh Ave., is showing new paintings by Pat Condron, David Campbell and Sidonie Caron, ceramics by Ingrid Bathe and Barbara Campbell, jewelry by Melissa Stiles, and sculpture by Sandy Visse and Javier Cervantes.

The gallery will be open until 8 p.m. Friday during the First Friday Art Walk.

Also holding an opening reception during the art walk is the New Zone Gallery, 164 W. Broadway, which is showing "Digital Latte," work by Rob and Tracy Sydor, in January.

The reception begins at 5:30 p. …

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