No-Go Britain; Fury as UN Drugs Chief Compares Parts of Inner-City UK to the Terrifying Murder and Drugs Capitals of Mexico and Brazil

Daily Mail (London), February 29, 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

No-Go Britain; Fury as UN Drugs Chief Compares Parts of Inner-City UK to the Terrifying Murder and Drugs Capitals of Mexico and Brazil


Byline: Jack Doyle Home Affairs Correspondent

BRITISH cities have lawless 'no-go areas' comparable with the most dangerous parts of Brazil, Mexico and the U.S., according to a United Nations drugs chief.

Professor Hamid Ghodse claimed Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester are on a par with the drug and murder capitals of the world.

The president of the International Narcotics Control Board said the police had lost control of parts of these cities, and drugs gangs had taken over.

But his comments caused fury from police and community leaders.

Tony Lloyd, Labour MP for Manchester Central, said: 'I walk the streets of Manchester on a regular basis. It is not the same as Bogota, it is not the same as Mexico City.

'He is either ignorant or stupid. If he has surveyed my city from the decadence of a five-star hotel room then he may well draw those conclusions.

'If he had come out with me on the streets he would see that people are living happily and peacefully.'

Liverpool council leader Joe Anderson said: 'Anyone who knows Liverpool will not recognise the city from the way in which this report is being interpreted.

The comparisons are fanciful and it is absurd to say any part of the city is a no-go area.'

Ahead of the publication of the INCB's annual report on drugs around the world, Professor Ghodse said urgent action was needed because parts

of the UK were experiencing 'social disintegration'.

The Iranian-born doctor claimed that Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester were experiencing 'a vicious cycle of social exclusion and drugs problems and fractured communities'.

'In many societies around the world, whether developed or developing, there are communities within the societies which develop which become no-go areas,' he went on.

'Drug traffickers, organised crime, drug users, they take over. They will get the sort of governance of those areas.

'Examples are in Brazil, Mexico, in the United States, in the UK, Birmingham, Liverpool, Manchester, and therefore it is no good to have only law enforcement, which always shows it does not succeed.

'It is crucial that the needs of communities experiencing social disintegration are urgently tackled before the tipping point is reached, beyond which effective action becomes impossible.

'The consequences of failure are too high for society and should be avoided at all cost.'

His comments were undermined by statistics showing the wildly differing crime rates between cities in England and South America.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

No-Go Britain; Fury as UN Drugs Chief Compares Parts of Inner-City UK to the Terrifying Murder and Drugs Capitals of Mexico and Brazil
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?