Top Women Executives Are Paid 10% Less Than Men

Daily Mail (London), March 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Top Women Executives Are Paid 10% Less Than Men


Byline: Becky Barrow Business Correspondent

HIGH-FLYING women in Britain are paid nearly 10 per cent less than a man doing exactly the same job, a report reveals today.

On average, a female executive gets a pay package of [pounds sterling]93,434 - but the man sitting in the next-door office with the same job title gets [pounds sterling]103,230.

The gap of nearly [pounds sterling]10,000 a year would add up to hundreds of thousands of pounds over their careers.

The report from executive pay experts Mercer said the reason for the gap was largely to do with 'simple discrimination'.

The situation is even worse in mainland Europe, according to the report which looked at 264,000 senior managers and executives in 41 countries.

In Germany, which has the worst gender pay gap in western Europe, a female execu-tive typically gets 22 per cent less than a man who does the same job. Bulgaria and Russia are the only two countries where the situation is reversed.

Maxine Benson, founder of Everywoman, the women's business network, said many women were hopeless at negotiating a good pay rise when they got a new job, unlike men.

She said: 'Women are not negotiating their value. They do not have the confidence in their worth.

'I have never met a successful woman who is not waiting for that tap on the shoulder [to say she is not good enough to be doing her job].'

Experts have named this the 'imposter syndrome' because women think they should not be doing their job and will be discovered as frauds at any moment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Top Women Executives Are Paid 10% Less Than Men
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.