Our Political Leaders Are Servants, Not Masters

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

Our Political Leaders Are Servants, Not Masters


Byline: GUEST VIEWPOINT By Laura Cooper

In five short years, Lane County has lost more than a third of its employment base in manufacturing. (See www.economicmodeling.com). Similar dismal numbers throughout the nonservice economy in Lane County are demonstrated in the same data, which supports what citizens have known intuitively for quite some time: Lane County has been subjected to catastrophic deindustrialization.

I strongly suspect the cause is radical left-wing environmentalism, resulting in a complex stew of business-unfriendly regulatory overlays, but that is beside the point. Lane County citizens are now at a crossroads - what I call a Weimar moment.

Although the depth of the problem in Lane County may not compare to the 1930s in Germany, its fundamental nature is not dissimilar: the Weimar Republic found that it was much more palatable to create political scapegoats for its economic failures than actually to solve them. The result was that an even worse political system was born in its wake, and that system brought Adolf Hitler to power.

Similarly, I fear that Lane County's future will very much depend on whether our citizens are willing to hold our leaders accountable for speaking the truth, or whether we would rather have them simply tell us what we want to hear - no matter how many fabrications or distortions are required to create that narrative.

I count myself as among those who want truth in order to create real, lasting solutions based on known science and history. In short, that means that the science of economics matters, and we must reject political narratives designed to appease a complicit news media and anesthetized public.

Fundamental truth-telling requires government to begin paying its bills (all of them), to stop promising benefits it cannot afford to provide, and for political leaders to stop using the public treasury as a political sword against political enemies, as a shield to benefit or bail out special political cronies, or as a personal piggy bank with which to enrich themselves or ensure their own return to power.

In short, until our political leadership and the government class it manages begin to behave like our servants instead of our masters, they will never grasp this Weimar moment.

In Oregon and Lane County, the first step in truth-telling is to reform the giant sucking sound coming from the Public Employees Retirement System, since every dollar that goes into PERS is one less dollar available to run the rest of government.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Our Political Leaders Are Servants, Not Masters
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.