Letters in the Editor's Mailbag

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), February 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Letters in the Editor's Mailbag


Byline: The Register-Guard

Israel needs its nuclear deterrent

I would like to comment on Galen Howard's Feb. 16 letter titled "Ban Israeli, Iranian nuclear arms." The only aggression Israel has ever been engaged in was to stop an imminent threat or to retaliate after being attacked.

Israel has been in possession of nuclear weapons for about 50 years and has used commendable restraint in not using them while being attacked repeatedly by its neighbors. The Iranian president has made it abundantly clear that he intends to use any means he has available to destroy Israel, and his country is actively funding terrorism primarily focusing on the Jewish state.

Israel is surrounded by nations far larger and richer that are governed by rulers who have not changed their minds about trying to run the Jews into the sea. Without this nuclear deterrent, eventually another holocaust would occur, and the surviving Jews would once again being fleeing for their lives.

Trying to hold a democracy like Israel to the same standard as fascist states such as Iran shows an inability to see the issue clearly.

Dan Hill

Cottage Grove

Another definition of 'natural law'

Ed Waggoner Sr. (letters, Feb. 18) and I agree that "natural laws" are the governing forces of the world in which we live. However, I would like to submit a different definition of natural law.

Waggoner states animals have no choice but to obey these laws. If that's the case, he must revise his list of unnatural acts, as the following have been observed in animals: sodomy, abortion (in the form of reabsorption of fetuses by rabbits following fertilization), theft, lying (in the form of misleading vocalizations), and fornication.

The strongest example of natural vs. artificial behavior that Waggoner brings up, birth control, is debatable on the grounds that the scientific and research methods that give us everything from hormonal contraceptives to vaccines to cures for leukemia spring from the human mind. This fantastic adaptation has evolved over the course of our history and is therefore, on some level, inherently "natural" since it is the source of our ingenuity as a species.

It is only in this light (as the product of human ingenuity) that marriage can be considered "natural," and without marriage there is no adultery or divorce, since both rely on the state of being married in order to be committed.

Finally, there are many traits exhibited by animals that are worth emulation by humans. These include altruism, care of the sick, care for the dead, teaching of young, communal peaceful living, and living within limits of environmental resources. It is in this positive light that I choose, as a human, to interact with "natural law."

Ariana White

Eugene

Health care is a human right

Health care is a human right. It is difficult to pursue happiness if you cannot get medically necessary health care. Article 25 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights declares that everyone has a right to a standard of living or other security adequate to provide medical care.

Health care is a human right. Two-thirds of the world's national constitutions specifically mention health care, and half of them declare either that people have a right to health care or the government has an obligation to provide health care.

Health care is a human right. Only one country in the world is rich enough to provide universal health care and does not do so. The U.S. health care system is ranked 37th, even though our per capita spending is 50 percent higher than that of any other country in the world, and is twice that of France, which has the highest rated system.

But will we have to wait for care if we treat it as a human right? In a study comparing wait times in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, New Zealand, the Netherlands, and Germany, only Canada had longer wait times in general than the U.

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