Focusing on Talent Trends: Executives Consider Which Leadership Development Strategies Will Work Best for Today's Uncertain Talent Market

By Garff, Marissa | T&D, March 2012 | Go to article overview

Focusing on Talent Trends: Executives Consider Which Leadership Development Strategies Will Work Best for Today's Uncertain Talent Market


Garff, Marissa, T&D


Looking to the future of leadership, many executives are predicting leader-ship shortages, prompting the need for accelerated leadership development, more tailored development programs, and new sources of growth. In response to these needs, Deloitte recently released the latest edition of a longitudinal survey series known as "Talent Edge 2020."

The survey series aims to address how companies are dealing with the changing demands of today's talent market, and discusses executive strategies of large national and global organizations. The January 2012 report, Talent Edge 2020: Redrafting talent strategies for the uneven recovery, draws from two previous studies based on executive and employee attitudes and talent concerns. Here are the report's key findings.

* In a struggling economy, organizations are looking for new sources of growth. According to those surveyed, most management attention is going to improving top- and bottom-line performance (38 per-cent); expanding into global and new markets (33 percent); cutting and managing costs (32 percent); and acquiring, serving, and retaining customers (32 percent).

* There is increasing pressure to create multipoint talent strategies that are both scalable and focused on regional markets. With needs varying from region to region, it can be difficult to create a scalable strategy that will address every concern.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

* The same executives predicting leadership shortages are likely those found to be focusing on strengthening their leadership development programs. …

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Focusing on Talent Trends: Executives Consider Which Leadership Development Strategies Will Work Best for Today's Uncertain Talent Market
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