The World on A Page

By Varadarajan, Tunku | Newsweek, March 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

The World on A Page


Varadarajan, Tunku, Newsweek


Byline: Tunku Varadarajan

A horse-riding prime minister, squabbling Aussies--and 'bailout' Sudoku.

WOMEN IN THE WORLD (BANK) Has Christine Lagarde's elevation to head of the International Monetary Fund spurred a copycat response at the Other Place? With the departure of Robert Zoellick from the helm (no, there was no room service involved), World Bank watchers have zeroed in on three American women who might succeed him: Ambassador Susan Rice, last seen spanking Syria at the U.N.; Indra Nooyi, the big fizz at PepsiCo; and Lael Brainard, a senior Treasury official. Of course, the woman everyone thinks will get the job is the one who says she isn't interested: Hillary Clinton.

HORSE OF THE WEEK: Raisa, a mare, who has given us the most compelling equine narrative in British history since Richard III. The horse once belonged to the London Metropolitan Police, which loaned her--controversially--to Rebekah Brooks, when she was editor of News of the World. After news broke of Brooks's horse trading with the police, Prime Minister David Cameron was compelled to issue a statement confessing an acquaintance with Raisa. Not many newspaper headlines will better this one, in The Telegraph: "David Cameron admits riding Rebekah Brooks's police horse."

MOST BORING TWEET IN HISTORY? From the Twitter account of India's prime minister, Manmohan Singh. @PMOIndia: "Proposals by National Commission for Macroeconomics & Health and the High Level Expert Group set up by Planning Commission to roll out soon."

BERTH CONTROL The rapidly capsizing relations between Argentina and Britain plumbed new depths when two British-flagged cruise liners were refused docking at the Argentine port city of Ushuaia. The behemoths had visited Port Stanley, in the disputed Falkland Islands, on their way to Argentina. Irate business owners in Ushuaia, denied an invasion of 3,250 free-spending vacationers, accused authorities of "economic suicide."

BRAINTEASERS An alert cameraman caught Wolfgang SchA uble, Germany's finance min-ister, playing a surreptitious game of Sudoku on his iPad during a parliamen-tary debate on a bailout for Greece. …

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