Meet Ernest & Hadley Big Read Introduces Fans to a Young Hemingway with 'The Paris Wife'

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

Meet Ernest & Hadley Big Read Introduces Fans to a Young Hemingway with 'The Paris Wife'


Writing a historic novel is somewhat like connecting dots of history with lines to create a picture.

"That is a nice way of thinking about it," said national best-selling author [URL]Paula McLain;http://www.lislelibrary.org/[/URL].

From a coffee shop near her home in Cleveland, Ohio, McLain talked about her book "The Paris Wife," the current Big Read selection for 10 area libraries.

For the eighth year, the [URL]Lisle Library;http://www.lislelibrary.org/[/URL] is joining forces with libraries in Clarendon Hills, Downers Grove, Hinsdale, Darien, LaGrange, LaGrange Park, Western Springs, Westmont and Woodridge to encourage patrons to read the same book. This year's selection gives readers opportunities to learn about the roaring 1920s, Paris, Spain, jazz and author Ernest Hemingway.

McLain began her writing career with two collections of poetry, an autobiographical book about her childhood in foster care and the novel "A Ticket to Ride."

The former high school English teacher said extensive research went into writing "The Paris Wife."

While searching for a possible book subject, McLain read "A Moveable Feast" in which [URL]Ernest Hemingway;http://www.ernest.hemingway.com/[/URL] wrote of his first wife, Hadley, "I wished I had died before I ever loved anyone but her."

The straightforward sentence tickled McLain's curiosity and she began to research the period of time in the early 1920s when Hemingway met and married Hadley Richardson Hemingway, followed by the young couple's years in Paris and the birth of their son.

"I did not know anything about (Ernest's) personal life beyond the mythology of Hemingway," McLain said. "I think that helped a great deal because I had no agenda in him. So when I began to write the book, I could let Hadley show me the way without trying to exonerate him or take him down."

McLain did much of her research at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum with its extensive Hemingway collection. On the museum's website, jfklibrary.org, an audio of Patrick Hemingway, Ernest's second son, said his father's letters are chatty and full of vivid details.

McLain found the subject of her book "The Paris Wife" when she read hundreds of letters between Hadley and Ernest Hemingway. This was the history she built her novel around.

"My story begins when Hadley and Ernest meet in Chicago at a party for the first time," McLain said. "My job then began by projecting myself into all the places that no biographer could ever presume to know. For instance, what did they say to each other, or what did they think about this first meeting, which became the challenge and the pleasure of writing the book."

To write as fast as she could, McLain left her teaching job. With $600 in the bank and young children to care for, she could not travel to all the destinations captured in the novel.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Meet Ernest & Hadley Big Read Introduces Fans to a Young Hemingway with 'The Paris Wife'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.