Nina Jacobson Hollywood Producer

By Streib, Lauren | Newsweek, March 19, 2012 | Go to article overview

Nina Jacobson Hollywood Producer


Streib, Lauren, Newsweek


Byline: Lauren Streib

After Disney gave her the pink slip, she got her revenge by scooping up The Hunger Games. Now she sits on a $1 billion franchise.

She isn't the fast-talking, expletive-spewing executive one might expect, given her career. Nina Jacobson is the powerhouse producer behind one of this year's most anticipated films, The Hunger Games, but she chafes at sounding falsely modest when describing how lucky she is to work in films. When recounting how she was unceremoniously fired from her post as head of Disney's $1 billion-plus movie studio, she pauses before boiling down the ill-timed episode to the G-rated explanation: "Stuff happens."

The Disney dismissal has been a defining parenthetical in her career since July 2006, when the news was famously delivered over the phone while she awaited the birth of her third child. Though her eight years as studio head were gilded by the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise and The Sixth Sense, among other hits, Disney fell from the top domestic studio by ticket sales in 2003 to the fifth in 2005. She was a casualty of the company's attempt to regain share. "If you're a bullfighter, you expect to get gored periodically," says Jacobson. "You just hope that you can get up and do it again. I don't feel sorry for myself."

Since starting over as a producer in 2007 with her own company, Color Force, she's notched a few modest successes, though Hunger Games will be her first blockbuster-caliber release. Jacobson saw potential in the series before it was a bestseller, when most studio heads deemed the story too violent for a bankable franchise. When she convinced author Suzanne Collins that she was the best producer to bring Hunger Games to the screen, the young-adult series had sold fewer than 200,000 copies. The trilogy centers on a teenage girl in a dystopian America who must engage in a deadly reality show for the entertainment of a wealthy class. Its ambitious themes--the perils of war, preoccupation with wealth and fame, and our growing fascination with voyeurism--have spurred a cultural fanaticism comparable to that for Twilight, leading the books to sell nearly 24 million copies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nina Jacobson Hollywood Producer
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.