Candid Cameraphone

By al-Abdeh, Malik | New Statesman (1996), February 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

Candid Cameraphone


al-Abdeh, Malik, New Statesman (1996)


In February 1982, a massacre was committed in the Syrian city of Hama. To put down a revolt, forces loyal to Hafez al-Assad levelled whole districts to the ground and murdered an estimated 20,000 people. Those wishing to commemorate this sad anniversary will, however, be hard-pressed to find any photos or video footage documenting the massacre. The regime made sure to keep the media out.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Thirty years on, the story could not be more different. Thanks to the internet and the mobile phone, incidents, however minor, can be recorded and shared with millions of people around the world. In Egypt, they called it the "Facebook Revolution". In Syria, it is the revolution of YouTube. With the media banned from reporting inside the country and the regime's propaganda machine in overdrive, uploading a video on YouTube became the only reliable method by which Syrians could hope to spread news of the crimes perpetrated against them. Thousands of videos have appeared since the start of the uprising in March 2011 and the number keeps growing.

The regime of Bashar al-Assad had long feared the subversive potential of the internet. It banned Facebook and YouTube, in addition to dozens of opposition websites. Activists hit back, using proxy servers to circumvent online censorship, but in a country where only 17 per cent of the population has access to the internet, satellite television remains the mass communication tool of choice. Visitors to Syria are struck by the number of satellite dishes on rooftops and it is through these that Syrians watch uncensored news. The visual aspect of YouTube lent itself perfectly to satellite channels hungry for footage of protests and crackdowns to accompany eyewitness accounts. …

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