Nuclear Regulatory Commission Leads with Continuous Learning

The Public Manager, Spring 2012 | Go to article overview

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Leads with Continuous Learning


Leaders at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) cite two critical elements of workplace success: the ethos of continuous learning and job rotation. "We emphasize rotational assignments so people understand how to connect the dots," says Jody Hudson, who oversees learning programs at the commission. NRC protects people and the environment from radiation hazards associated with commercial use of nuclear materials and nuclear power, and regulates the nuclear industry through licensing, inspection, and enforcement.

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The Partnership for Public Service recently reported that NRC is ranked number one among federal agencies in training and development. The Public Manager asked NRC learning leaders: How do you teach effective leadership that fosters NRC business and also makes it a good place to work for public managers?

"It's important to leverage the intellectual assets in your organization. By using technology and communities of practice (CoP), passing on knowledge can be 'one to many' instead of 'one to one.'" Putting courses online achieves salary, time, and travel savings, and allows learners to fit training into their schedule. "Electronic CoPs become something learning professionals can tap." A board of agency senior executives governs leadership development, models continuous learning, and selects candidates for competitive leadership programs. "Employees see leaders setting the example and they follow suit. …

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Nuclear Regulatory Commission Leads with Continuous Learning
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