First Position

Artforum International, March 2012 | Go to article overview

First Position


Left: Sturtevant, Pac-Man (working title), 2012, still from a video animation, 1 minute 15 seconds.

Above: Sturtevant. Blow Job, 2006, still) from a three-channel color video. 1 minute 30 seconds.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Left: Sturtevant. Duchamp Fresh Widow. 1992. enamel paint on wood, leather, brass knobs, glass, 301/4x201/4x41/8

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Right: Sturtevant, Trilogy of Transgression, 2004, still from a three-channel color video. 1 minute 40 seconds.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Above: Sturtevant, The Dark Threat of Absence Fragmented and Sliced, 2002, seven color videos. Installation view, Museum fur Moderne Kunst, Frankfurt, 2004. Photo: Axel Schneider.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Below: Sturtevant, Spinoza in Las Vegas, 2008. Performance view, Tate Modern, London, November 1, 2008. Photo: Sheila Burnett.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Below: Sturtevant, Sex Dolls, 2012, sex dolls. Installation view, Moderna Museet. Stockholm, 2012. Photo: Arash Nassiri.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

WE CAN'T GET ENOUGH. We love to rediscover STURTEVANT, to relive her relentlessly recombinant logic. We love the way her work multiplies, whether as hyperspeed sexed-up video clip or scandalously wholesale copy or the readymade we never really knew. And we've probably reinterpreted the legendary Parts-based artist as many times as she has reinterpreted the work of others. But over the past several years, Sturtevant has seemed to outstrip even the manic proliferation suggested by her reproductions of Warhol Marilyns and factory-line sex dolls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

First Position
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.