Report of the 2011 Joint Committee on Health Education and Promotion Terminology

American Journal of Health Education, March-April 2012 | Go to article overview

Report of the 2011 Joint Committee on Health Education and Promotion Terminology


2011 JOINT COMMITTEE ON HEALTH EDUCATION AND PROMOTION TERMINOLOGY MEMBERS

Kelli McCormack Brown, Ph.D., CHES

Committee Co-Chair

Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

College of Health & Human Performance

University of Florida

Mohammad R. Torabi, Ph.D., MPH, MSPH

Committee Co-Chair

Interim Dean and Chancellor's Professor

School of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation

Indiana University-Bloomington

Trina M. Anglin, MD, Ph.D.

Chief, Adolescent Health Branch

Representing the Maternal and Child Health Bureau

Health Resource and Services Administration

Susan Goekler, Ph.D., MCHES

Executive Director, Directors of Health Promotion and Education

Representing the Directors of Health Promotion and Education

Cindy Hormel, RD, LD, SNS

Director, Nutrition Education and Advocacy

Representing the Food and Nutrition

Services, United States Department of Agriculture

James F. McKenzie, Ph.D., MPH, MCHES

Professor, Department of Public Health Sciences

Penn State Hershey

Representing the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. (NCHEC)

Debra L. Sutton, Ph.D.

Associate Professor

James Madison University

Representing Eta Sigma Gamma the National Health Education Honorary

Stephen B. Thomas, Ph.D.

Professor, Health Service Administration

University of Maryland School of Public Health

Representing the Society of Public Health Education (SOPHE)

Katherine Wilbur, MEd, MCHES

National Health Education and Policy Manager

Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Representing the American Association for Health Education (AAHE)

David Wiley, Ph.D., MCHES

Professor, Health Education

Texas State University

Representing the American School Health Association (ASHA)

AAHE STAFF:

Linda Moore, MS

Acting Executive Director

American Association for Health Education (AAHE)

Becky J. Smith, Ph.D., MCHES, CAE

Terminology Project Consultant

B. J. Smith Consulting

Meaghan Walsh, BS

Project Assistant

American Association for Health Education (AAHE)

FOREWORD

Recognizing that the health education and promotion fields are constantly evolving, representatives of the professional health education associations have convened every ten years to define terms key to the work of the profession. Well defined and widely accepted essential terms help health education and promotion professionals communicate accurately with one another and with those outside the profession.

The rate of the change in the field between 2000 and 2011 has increased due to the electronic and digital revolution as well as to national and international recognition of the importance of disease prevention and health promotion through health education/ promotion and the skyrocketing of health care costs. The practice of health education and promotion will continue to evolve quickly during the next decade.

Seven major terminology reports have been developed for health education over the past 80 years. The Public Health Education Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA) developed the first statement of terminology around 1927 (1). The first Joint Terminology Committee was established in the 1930s by the Health Education Section of the American Physical Education Association (APEA) and released the first terminology report in 1934 (2). Since then, a new report has been generated each decade producing a total of seven major terminology reports (2-7). In 1950, the American Public Health Association (APHA) took the lead and involved the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation (AAHPER). …

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