Opinion: The Marketing Society Forum - Should Advertisers Have a Role in the Policing of Newspapers and Blogs?

Marketing, April 4, 2012 | Go to article overview
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Opinion: The Marketing Society Forum - Should Advertisers Have a Role in the Policing of Newspapers and Blogs?


MPs have proposed that brands use their adspend to help enforce regulation of newspapers.

NO - JANE ASSCHER, MANAGING PARTNER AND CHAIRMAN, 23RED

Advertisers already have a de facto, but unofficial, policing role Brands' withdrawal from the News of the World was a key contributor to the title's closure, for example.

Editorial context and advertising content have a symbiotic relationship If the former gets out of kilter with the readership, the latter becomes less effective, and clients vote with their wallets.

While the advertising industry's self-regulatory system is funded by the ASBOF/BASBOF pounds 1 in pounds 1000 levy on client media expenditure, it's unlikely that the replacement for the PCC will be supported financially by advertisers. Thus it will fall to the publishing industry to set its house in order and underwrite its new policeman.

NO - TOM HINGS, CONSULTANT AND FORMER ROYAL MAIL MARKETING DIRECTOR

Any enforcement of a code needs clear guidelines as to what is and is not acceptable. The press exposure of MPs' expenses claims in 2009 was welcomed by the public and advertisers, but was any code broken? With the phone-hacking scandal, everyone was very clear regarding unacceptable behaviour and advertisers quickly reacted.

The proposed code continues to be one of self-regulation and I would be amazed if any newspaper or social-media site worth its salt wouldn't sign up to it.

We live in a democratic society and the choice as to whether a media outlet signs up to the code or an advertiser advertises within it is theirs to make. Regulation is for government, not advertisers.

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Opinion: The Marketing Society Forum - Should Advertisers Have a Role in the Policing of Newspapers and Blogs?
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