Mayor's Challenge for Water Conservation: Celebrating 40 Years of the Clean Water Act

By Vasudevan, Raksha | Nation's Cities Weekly, March 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

Mayor's Challenge for Water Conservation: Celebrating 40 Years of the Clean Water Act


Vasudevan, Raksha, Nation's Cities Weekly


This year marks the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act (CWA), the primary federal law protecting water resources in the United States. In celebration and recognition of this milestone, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), together with partners across the country, is kicking off a series of events and activities to raise awareness about the importance of water throughout communities.

Through a newly launched EPA website--http://epa.gov/cleanwater40--city leaders and residents will find resources, ideas and information to promote water awareness, share best practices and review successes over the past forty years to protect and conserve water resources.

One particular action that city leaders are invited to participate in is the "Mayor's Challenge for Water Conservation." Developed by the Wyland Foundation, in partnership with Toyota, the EPA, EPA WaterSense, the U.S. Forest Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association, National Geographic Explorer in Residence Dr. Sylvia Earle, WaterPik, Rain Bird, Lowe's and STERLING Plumbing, this initiative calls on mayors to challenge each other's cities and encourage residents to conserve water, save energy and reduce pollution throughout the month of April.

The challenge requires no additional staff time or cost to cities and will be promoted in USA Today, on AOL and via local and national news media. …

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