The World of Paperbacks

Contemporary Review, September 2011 | Go to article overview

The World of Paperbacks


There is a rich harvest of new titles from VALE UNIVERSITY PRESS and we begin with Prof. Michael Slater's highly praised biography, Charles Dickens ([pounds sterling] 12.99) which the reviewer in this journal said 'gives us a Dickens far more complex and nuanced than was hitherto assumed'. Next we turn to Steve Pincus' 1688: The First Modem Revolution ([pounds sterling] 16.99) in which he argues that the 'Glorious Revolution was far more than a Whig coup d'etat and challenges many accepted interpretation of the events of that year. Also from Yale we have: James Mather's Pashas: Traders and Travellers in the Islamic World ([pounds sterling] 12.99) which describes the discoveries made by traders from London's Levant Company from the 16th to the dawn of the 19th centuries; David Crystal's A Little Book of Language ([pounds sterling] 8.99), his wide-ranging analysis of the uses and development of language; Charles Freeman's A New History of Early Christianity ([pounds sterling] 12.99) in which he examines the divergent strains that made up belief in the early centuries and gives his support to the ranks of Resurrection deniers; Terry Eagleton's On Evil ([pounds sterling] 10.99), an interesting analysis of what is and what is not evil; and finally. Prof. Bruce Gordon's Calvin ([pounds sterling] 15.99), his biography of the unlovable but undeniably important reformer who did so much to shape the religious upheavals of his day.

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS has published a wide range of new paperbacks: Paul Glennie and Nigel Thrift's Shaping the Day: A History of Timekeeping in England and Wales 1300-1800 ([pounds sterling] 24.95), a fascinating account of the development of clocks and clock-times through the centuries; Christopher Fletcher's Richard II: Manhood, Youth, and Politics, 1377-99 ([pounds sterling] 24.95) which asks how the concept of 'manhood' can be used to understand Richard's troubled reign; Susan E. Whyman's The Pen and die People: English Letter Writers 1660-1800 ([pounds sterling] 18.99), a thorough investigation into the writing of letters and how they were used by our first novelists; Glyn Redworlh's The She Apostle: The Extraordinary Life and Death of Luisa de Carvajal ([pounds sterling] 10.99) the first biography of the Spanish woman who came to London in 1605 to risk everything on behalf of the capital's Recusants; Stuart Carroll's award-winning Martyrs and Murderers: The Guise Family and the Making of Europe ([pounds sterling] 10.99), a new look at this extraordinary dynasty; Prof David Fergusson's Faith and Its Critics: A Conversation ([pounds sterling] 9.99), his investigation (based on the author's 2008 Gilford Lectures) of the current phase among some of the intelligentsia for atheism and the debate they have with believers; and George C. Herring's award winning study. From Colony to Superpower: U.S. Foreign Relations since 1776 ([pounds sterling] 14.99), in which the author traces the development of the United States' foreign policy in a world often less than grateful for their intervention. O.U.R has also brought out a sixth edition of its famous Concise Oxford Dictionary of Quotations [pounds sterling] 10.99) with 1300 new entries drawn from the 20,000 quotes in the seventh edition of the Oxford Dictionary of Quotations. Other new reference works include a revised, fifth edition of David Hugh Farmer's The Oxford Dictionary of Saints ([pounds sterling] 11.99) which brings this valuable work up to dale. The Oxford Companion to Irish History ([pounds sterling] 12.99) edited by S.J. Connolly and The Oxford Companion to Scottish History ([pounds sterling] 12.99), both of which were last published in paperback in 2007. Each gives the reader a treasure house of readily accessible information. In the Oxford World's Classics series we have, with helpful notes introductions, bibliographies and chronologies, new editions of Anthony Trollope's The Eustace Diamonds ([pounds sterling] 9.99), his story of greed, crime and high society, here edited by Helen Small, The Prime Minister ([pounds sterling] 10. …

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