Please update your browser

You're using a version of Internet Explorer that isn't supported by Questia.
To get a better experience, go to one of these sites and get the latest
version of your preferred browser:

The Phone-Hacking Scandal: British Politics Transformed?

By Simanowitz, Stefan | Contemporary Review, December 2011 | Go to article overview

The Phone-Hacking Scandal: British Politics Transformed?


Simanowitz, Stefan, Contemporary Review


WATCHING the octogenarian Rupert Murdoch arrive for his appearance before the Parliamentary select committee hearings in July, I was reminded of a wildlife documentary I once saw in which the alpha male of a chimpanzee community was challenged for dominance by a younger ape. The older chimp was soundly beaten by the young pretender and as he limped off into the jungle to lick his wounds, the rest of the troop - including some of his own offspring - descended on him, tearing him limb from limb. It seemed that day as if Murdoch might face a similar fate. Wounded by the loss of his closest lieutenants - Les Hinton and Rebekah Brooks, the humiliating collapse of his BSkyB bid, the falling price of News Corp shares, and a wave of public outrage it seemed that both Murdoch's enemies and his former friends might turn on him. Broadsheet newspapers backed by the 'feral beasts' of the tabloids were closing in and politicians who had always trembled and fawned at his feet looked as if they might join the kill.

However Murdoch's 'humble old man' performance before a largely lacklustre panel of MPs combined with some swift damage limitation exercises by News Corp's public relations company were effective. Apologies were made, people were sacked, a newspaper was shut down, and multi-million pound pay-outs were made to some of the phone hacking victims. The company's share price stabilised and Murdoch lived to fight another day. But the story did not go away. New aspects of the scandal are being unearthed by journalists, detectives and inquiry panels on both sides of the Atlantic. As the inquiries progress and the extent of the criminality, corruption and complicity is revealed the public and political classes will be forced to confront some deeply unpleasant realities. This in turn could lead to a significant transformation of the British political landscape.

The 'phone-hacking scandal' refers to the systematic hacking of phones belonging to politicians, celebrities, members of the public and even the police but it is about much more than the unlawful intercepts of voicemails. It is also about illegal payments made to police officers, attempts to pervert the course of justice and exert undue influence over politicians. It raises issues about press regulation, media ownership, and the nature of the relationship between our journalists, police, and politicians. The scandal is not restricted to one newspaper, one media company or even one country. Instead the tentacles of this scandal stretch deep into the very heart of how global corporate power works.

The facts of the case are not easy to sum up since they stretch back almost a decade and spill out in many directions. The scandal first entered the public consciousness in August 2006 when the News of the World's royal editor, Clive Goodman, and a private investigator, Glenn Mulcaire, were arrested over allegations that they hacked into the mobile phones in the Royal household. They both admitted to plotting to intercept communications and Mulcaire also pleaded guilty to five other charges of unlawfully intercepting voicemail messages. They received short jail terms and the newspaper's editor, Andy Coulson, resigned whilst at the same time denying all knowledge of phone-hacking activity.

An internal News of the World (NoW) investigation following the court case found no evidence of widespread hacking at the paper concluding that Goodman was a single 'rogue reporter'. The Press Complaints Commission, an independent body overseeing the self-regulation of the press, supported this view in their 2007 report on the matter.

Following the guilty pleas, Gordon Taylor, Chief Executive of the Professional Footballers Association made a claim for breach of privacy against the NoW relating to the alleged hacking of his phone. His claim was settled out of court for [pounds sterling] 700,000; this payment, it later emerged, had been approved by James Murdoch.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Phone-Hacking Scandal: British Politics Transformed?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.