Migrations: Journeys into British Art

By Davies, Christie | New Criterion, April 2012 | Go to article overview

Migrations: Journeys into British Art


Davies, Christie, New Criterion


"Migrations: Journeys into British Art"

Tate Britain, London.

January 31--August 12, 2012

"Mondrian || Nicholson: In Parallel"

The Courtauld Gallery, London.

February 16-May 20, 2012

"Migrations" at Tate Britain is an account of the arrival of European and American artists in Britain and their contributions to and influences on British art. The overall narrative is broken down into a series of separate sections.

It begins with the many Dutch and Flemish painters who came to England in the seventeenth century to enjoy the patronage of British kings and aristocrats who wanted their portraits painted by the best artists of the day, artists who already enjoyed an international reputation. Here we find Anthony van Dyck's iconic portrayals Charles I (1636) and Charles's French queen, Henrietta Maria (1636). Artists from the Low Countries also introduced landscape painting to England when Charles I commissioned ten paintings of towns and castles in the north of England from 1638 to 1641. Furthermore, Dutch skill in depicting ships and the sea may be seen in Willem van de Velde the Younger's The Departure of William of Orange and Princess Mary for Holland (1677), painted when he was working for Charles II, who wanted a record of this dynastic marriage. There is an irony of sorts here, for only eleven years later William was to return with a substantial fleet and depose Charles II's brother, James II, and reign jointly with his wife, James's daughter, as William and Mary.

The exhibition progresses into the eighteenth century, the period when members of a cultured and wealthy English elite traveled south on the Grand Tour in search of art and classical ruins and Italy became a key influence on British art. When war interrupted the tours, Canaletto came to England for nine years in pursuit of his clients and substituted London's parks for the canals of Venice. The Italian connection assisted the triumph of neo-classical ideals of order, harmony, and beauty in England, as well as the creation of a distinctive artistic profession. When the Royal Academy was set up in 1768, a third of the founding members were migrants who had settled in Britain. Benjamin West of Pennsylvania, who had come to live in London in 1763 and served as the historical painter to George III, became the second president of the Royal Academy, succeeding Sir Joshua Reynolds.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Migrations: Journeys into British Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.