How Don Draper Could Catapult Mitt Romney to the White House

Daily Mail (London), April 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

How Don Draper Could Catapult Mitt Romney to the White House


Byline: The Mary Ellen Synon COLUMN

LAST week I wrote about the mesmerising nature of French politics now, what with Socialist politician Dominique Strauss-Kahn destroying his presidential chances in sex scandals, the current Socialist candidate for president having four children out of wedlock with the Socialist presidential candidate in the last election, and with Nicolas Sarkozy tainted by his reputation for bling and his wife's reputation for - well, for a lot.

It is no wonder with that going on in France that I warned at New Year that in America the primaries for the nomination in the November presidential election would be unexciting. I said the time was long gone in American politics when there were candidates worth getting excited about.

How could it be any other way with the 'Massachusetts moderate' Mitt Romney as the inevitable Republican candidate against Barack Obama, about whom even the Democrat party leaders now have a hard time feeling any enthusiasm? So, no political excitement in the U.S. presidential election. But it now seems maybe some fun: just as Rick Santorum, the only possible alternative to a Romney nomination, bows out, a scandal over President Obama's Secret Service agents and South American prostitutes has come to light. It appears it is not just Mr Strauss-Kahn who has all the slutty sex in foreign hotel rooms.

Eleven Secret Service agents who were operating in Cartagena last week to prepare security for the president at the Summit of the Americas have been 'relieved of their duties' and shipped home. The allegations are that some of the men were soliciting prostitutes, others were trying to cover it up - and one agent was stupid enough and mean enough to refuse to pay his hooker the $47, about [euro]36, for her service.

She complained to the police, which blew the story open.

All this came out in time for President Obama to have to face the embarrassment as he met 33 heads of state and government at the summit.

Now the story has spread to include five members of the military who were also in Cartagena to protect their Commander-in-Chief, along with allegations of heavy drinking among Secret Service staff.

Why is this important for the election? Because the first advantage any president has in an election race is his ability to look 'presidential'. Instead, the president has a Secret Service detail so badly managed that prostitutes - in particular in this case, women inevitably tied up with the Colombian drug trade and therefore the terrorists who run Colombian drugs production - turn up a story that is supposed to be about Latin American foreign policy.

This does not look presidential. It looks inept. It's a blow to the Obama image.

Meanwhile, Obama's campaign team have been trying to damage the Romney image, but their efforts there look inept, too. An anti-Romney commercial has been running on television trying to cast Mitt Romney as the Don Draper of today. Opening voiceover: 'I think he [Romney] must watch Mad Men and think it's the evening news. He's just in a time warp.' Then the commercial cuts between scenes of Don Draper saying he finds it easy to sleep at night because he sleeps 'on a bed made of money' and Mr Romney saying 'I've made a lot of money. I'm not going to apologise for that.' And on the commercial goes, trying to make voters think that Romney is Draper. But the problem is this: the reason the fictional Don Draper is so well-known in America - memo to those few who don't know, Draper is a tall, dark, super-smooth Madison Avenue advertising executive circa 1960 - is that most men, secretly or otherwise, want to be him, and women, not secretly at all, think he is the most alluring man on television.

Miscalculation All the Democrats are doing in what is being called the 'Draperisation of Romney' is sprinkling a little of the magic of the dashing Draper on the very dull Mormon Romney. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

How Don Draper Could Catapult Mitt Romney to the White House
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.