Obama's Tax Hike Patriotism; Wrapping the Flag around Big-Government Excess Isn't Going to Work

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama's Tax Hike Patriotism; Wrapping the Flag around Big-Government Excess Isn't Going to Work


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Vice President Joe Biden says paying higher taxes is patriotic. He must have forgotten that America was founded on a tax revolt.

While pitching the Obama administration's plan on Thursday to boost the burden on upper-income groups, Mr. Biden said, Wealthy people are just as patriotic as middle-class people, as poor people, and they know they should be doing more. This skewed take on patriotism was quickly retweeted by the White House. The message fits with the shameful class-warfare appeals that claim tax hikes are needed to keep firefighters on the job or pay for Pell grants. More accurately, they're needed to underwrite $200,000 in stimulus money to move a shrub or to bankroll yet another failed green energy project.

We're not supposed to have a system with one set of rules for the wealthy and one set of rules for everyone else, said Mr. Biden. Yet that's exactly what the White House wants. The administration's fiscal 2013 budget proposal included $2.1 trillion in new taxes over 10 years that are aimed at upper-income groups and those who rely on dividend income. The top 10 percent of income earners already pay about 50 percent of all federal, state and local taxes. The next 40 percent pay most of the rest, and the bottom half pay next to nothing. President Obama continually uses the word fairness to justify gobbling up more of the public's money, but if he were truly interested in being equitable he would seek ways to lower the overwhelming tax burden being carried by the middle class and above. …

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