Lives Were Lived and Lost and a Collective Memory Was Acquired Which Still Haunts These Places; Wales' Military Airfields Reveal Stories of Wartime Activity and the Impact They Had on Ordinary People, Says Jonathan Berry, Cadw's Regional Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Archaeology

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 17, 2012 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Lives Were Lived and Lost and a Collective Memory Was Acquired Which Still Haunts These Places; Wales' Military Airfields Reveal Stories of Wartime Activity and the Impact They Had on Ordinary People, Says Jonathan Berry, Cadw's Regional Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Archaeology


Byline: Jonathan Berry

Military airfields had the most profound impact on the landscape of all of the different types of military sites built in the twentieth century.

Land was requisitioned by a government official, stripped of its defining landmarks, drained, re-graded and levelled. Farms were relocated, streams culverted and roads diverted or closed.

On this blank canvas an airfield was imprinted. Each was carefully planned to accommodate both the functions of a technology-led service and accommodation for its operatives. Barracks and housing were ordered by rank and sex for the communities of flyers, technicians, administrators and their families who lived there.

Airfields possessed official boundaries within which buildings and structures were built to standard Air Ministry or Admiralty designs.

More attention was paid to the design and look of officers' messes, station headquarters and guard houses compared with the more functional technical blocks, hangars and control towers. Many buildings were less permanent, using temporary construction methods and austerity materials.

Despite their size and complexity military airfields are particularly vulnerable to re-development and clearance. Many, such as Wrexham and Angle in Pembrokeshire, have almost disappeared. It is important that aspects of this military heritage are preserved so that future generations can experience and understand the motivations and pressures of this period. For this reason, Cadw has recently commissioned the Welsh Archaeological Trusts to assess the surviving remains on the military airfields of Wales so that we can identify which buildings are suitable for legal protection.

During the First World War a large number of airfields were built, but most were subsequently abandoned and few extant remains survive. The main inter-war developments were the construction of Cardiff Municipal Airport at Pengam Moors and the Flying Boat Station at Pembroke Dock plus a growing number of RAF training airfields, particularly from 1937 onwards.

Of the 33 Welsh wartime airfields, the majority hosted training units, aircraft storage stations and maintenance bases, including six fighter stations and four Coastal Command bases. Seaplane bases at Pembroke Dock and Lawrenny Ferry guarded the Western Approaches.

An airfield's plan reflects its different functions. Based on the concept of dispersal, technical buildings and aircraft were separated by large spaces to protect personnel and equipment from the lethal effects of attack and blast. The organisation and layout of airfield buildings and activity zones were characterised by pre-determined locations, distances and directions between technical facilities and zones of the airfield, to enhance efficiency, safety and usage under pressure.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lives Were Lived and Lost and a Collective Memory Was Acquired Which Still Haunts These Places; Wales' Military Airfields Reveal Stories of Wartime Activity and the Impact They Had on Ordinary People, Says Jonathan Berry, Cadw's Regional Inspector of Ancient Monuments and Archaeology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.