Civil Servants on a Pension. and a Wage Too

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), April 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

Civil Servants on a Pension. and a Wage Too


Byline: Andrew Picken SCOTTISH POLITICAL EDITOR

A GROWING army of civil servants in Scotland is exploiting an employment loophole that allows them to be paid twice.

Taxpayers are being forced to foot the bill as dozens of Scottish Government staff draw their publicly-funded pensions - while still continuing to be paid a salary.

The staggering deal allows civil servants to 'partially retire' from their jobs by reducing their hours, but make up the earnings shortfall by accessing their pension pot early.

A little-known rule in the Civil Service pension scheme was changed in 2008 to allow public sector workers to partially retire, but only if their salary was reduced by at least 20 per cent.

Figures obtained by the Scottish Mail on Sunday show that 94 Scottish Government workers have taken up the generous arrangement.

Included in this haul are three workers who enjoy annual salaries of more than [pounds sterling]66,000, despite working only part-time.

The revelations will be a bitter blow for the many private sector workers who do not even have a pension - even though they have to fund those of state employees.

TaxPayers' Alliance spokesman Emma Boon said: 'Taxpayers are sick of hearing about the civil servants we pay twice - it should be pension or pay, not both.

'Many people are struggling to save for their own retirement, so it will stick in their throat to see public sector workers partially retiring early with generous taxpayer-funded pension pots.' Figures released under freedom of information laws show that a total of 94 permanent staff at the Scottish Government work part-time and at the same time receive their pension. This includes three people who earn more than [pounds sterling]66,671, 14 who earn between [pounds sterling]43,736 and [pounds sterling]66,671, and a further 40 members of staff who earn between [pounds sterling]22,173 and [pounds sterling]40,173. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Civil Servants on a Pension. and a Wage Too
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.