Are Your Students READY for Learning?

By Himberg, Cathrine; Shephard, Kevin et al. | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, April 2012 | Go to article overview

Are Your Students READY for Learning?


Himberg, Cathrine, Shephard, Kevin, Ttout, Joshua, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Do you, like so many teachers, have some students who just do not seem to know what their "job" is as learners? Students who roll their eyes at your requests, talk to classmates during instructions, throw the equipment on the floor or into the bin, do not turn in homework, give up trying at the first sign of difficulty, taunt others when they are not successful, or worse, call others derogatory names? If you have never experienced these behaviors from students, you probably do not need to read this article. But if you have, read on for a solution that has worked for the authors.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

In the past 20 years, the field of physical education has increased its focus on assessment practices that are meaningful for students and useful for monitoring their learning. It is reasonable to want evidence that students have met certain state or national standards, but it is not always easy to produce significant proof of learning and achievement. Physical education teachers commonly use skill rubrics and criteria checklists to assess the psychomotor domain, quizzes and tests to evaluate lower-level cognitive learning, and fitness tests to measure fitness components. Those who are well versed in assessment use a variety of alternative and authentic assessments to get better answers to the questions, "What do my students know?" (cognitive domain) and "What are they able to do?" (psychomotor domain). The affective learning domain, however, is more difficult to evaluate because of teachers' tendency to be subjective. Characteristics such as being respectful and having a positive attitude are more ambiguous than knowledge of the cues for the tennis backhand or the demonstration of a dance move. Even though these affective characteristics are important to the student and the learning environment, they are commonly "eyeballed" because they are harder to measure. Yet, anyone who teaches, at any level, knows that establishing a positive learning environment, where students are held accountable for their behavior, is the first and most important task in teaching. Successful teachers find methods that work for them, and we have found a method that works for us the READY rubric to assess student behaviors that impact learning (figure 1). Students use the rubric to assess themselves so they can become familiar with the teacher's expectations, and learn to be ready for class.

Figure 1. The READY Rubric for Middle and High Schools

Name: Kevin  My favorite sports/physical activities: Roller
Shephard     hockey, backpacking, and weight lifting

             I participate regularly in these sports/physical
             activities: Roller hockey

             My other hobbies include: Playing video games, and
             the Internet

             One thing you should know about me: I like to talk

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

A Brief History of the READY Rubric

The READY rubric was born out of need, in a physical education teacher education (PETE) program. One bad apple (who threatened to spoil the whole bunch), in Himberg's PETE assessment course, inspired the first READY rubric. The rubric, which was in turn influenced by Hellison's (2003) social responsibility model, was revised a little every semester for a couple of years. Other professors started expressing their frustration with certain students who acted in ways that limited their own and others' learning. Some PETE students were often late to class (or leaving early), not reading for class, not participating during discussions or in-class tasks, and even texting or falling asleep during lectures. The READY rubric was used in several more PETE courses to hold students accountable on a daily basis, and to help them develop the professional behaviors that relate to best teaching and learning practices. After experiencing the READY rubric in their PETE courses, many students tried it with their middle and high school classes during student teaching, and later in their own classes after graduation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Are Your Students READY for Learning?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.