2012 AAHPERD Recognition Awards

JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, April 2012 | Go to article overview

2012 AAHPERD Recognition Awards


LUTHER HALSEY GULICK AWARD

The Luther Halsey Gulick Medal, designed by R. Tait McKenzie, is the highest honor awarded by the Alliance in recognition of long and distinguished service to one or more of the professions.

Donald F. Staffo, professor and chair emeritus of the Department of Health and Physical Education at Stillman College, has been an educator for 44 years and department chair for 33 consecutive years. The fourth person to win AAHPERD's three highest awards, his numerous awards include the AAHPERD Honor and Charles Henry Awards; the National Health & Fitness Association Henderson Award; ASAHPERD Honor, Ethnic Minority Leader, and "Professional Responsibility for Delivering Excellence" awards; and The Ohio State University School of Physical Activity & Educational Services Distinguished Alumni Award. He is in The Ohio State University College of Education & Human Ecology Hall of Fame, the State University of New York (SUNY)-Brockport Hall of Heritage, and the Stillman Zeta Phi Beta Hall of Fame. He is also the only person to win all of Stillman's top awards and the first to be honored with the title emeritus.

Donald has authored 11 books, 117 scholarly articles, a health and fitness newspaper column, and more than 2,000 articles, many of which appeared in national and regional magazines. He has made 73 presentations at AAHPERD national conventions and district and state conferences. He has served on 35 editorial and advisory boards, including for the International Journal of Sport Management, ICHPER*SD Journal of Research, and The Physical Educator. He also served as editor of the ASAHPERD Journal, two terms as chair of the NASPE Youth Sports Coalition, on NASPE's original Task Force that developed the National Coaching Standards, Alabama Governor's Task Force for Physical Activity, the first Alabama Governor's Planning Committee Conference for Childhood Obesity, and the Task Force that developed the Great South Athletic Conference.

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HONOR AWARD

The Honor Award is bestowed upon members of the Alliance for meritorious service to the professions represented.

Marybell Avery is a curriculum specialist for health, physical education, and character education for Lincoln Public Schools (LPS) in Lincoln, Nebraska, where she has directed the curriculum, instruction, and professional development program for K-12 health and physical education since 1994. She has taught physical education at the preschool, elementary, high school, and university levels for 36 years.

Lincoln's Morley Elementary School earned the NASPE STARS award for offering an outstanding physical education program. A growing district of more than 36,500 students, LPS also received Carol M. White PEP grants in 2002 and in 2009 under Marybell's leadership.

Marybell served for 10 years on NASPE's Assessment Task Force that developed PE Metrics, the national standards assessments. She was president of NASPE in 2000-01 and NASPE representative to the Alliance Board of Governors in 2003-06. In 2007 she received the Margie R. Hanson Distinguished Service Award for her outstanding contributions toward quality physical education programs for children, and in 2011 she was awarded NASPE's Channing Mann K-12 Physical Education Administrator of the Year Award.

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Marilyn Buck began her professional career in 1974 as a junior-high physical education instructor and coach of the girls' basketball and track teams. After a 12-year career in the public schools, she completed her Ed.D. at Brigham Young University in 1989. She began her teacher education career at Ball State University as assistant professor in 1989. In 2007, she assumed the role of associate provost and dean at University College.

Marilyn's contributions to the Alliance include serving on NASPE's Middle and Secondary School Physical Education Committee, as president of the Midwest District AAHPERD, and as Board of Governor's representative for the Midwest District.

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