Where Two Kinds of Wildness Collide: In the Second in a Series of Essays on Nature and Landscape, Richard Mabey Sees a Premonition of Spring in the Marshlands of North Norfolk

By Mabey, Richard | New Statesman (1996), April 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Where Two Kinds of Wildness Collide: In the Second in a Series of Essays on Nature and Landscape, Richard Mabey Sees a Premonition of Spring in the Marshlands of North Norfolk


Mabey, Richard, New Statesman (1996)


Psychogeographers, the cognoscenti tell us, have been rebranded less dizzily as "deep topographers". The BBC's arts editor, Will Gompertz, is making a film about an aspiring new acolyte, and is asking me if I see myself as one of their company. We're sitting on a bench in the Oxford Botanic Garden, surrounded by irises and service trees, and I answer, too snap-pily, no, I'm a shallow topographer. It's a smart-arsed, irritable reflex at these tiresome abstractions but I realise that I'm serious. I try to explain how, for me, landscapes are paramountly about their present life, their vivacious, protean, membranous surfaces, not some intangible, semimystical motherlode. By lucky chance there's a visual aid on tap. From where we're sitting, the gate of the Botanic Gardens, built in 1633, was intended to perfectly frame the Great Tower of Magdalen College, and form a kind of Age of Enlightenment ley line. The wild card intervened and the local builders misaligned it by a jarring five degrees.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

I was being disingenuous, of course. Landscapes and nature work by a constant juggle between pattern and process, chaos and order. Rock meets weather. Evanescent greenleaf generates hardwood trunk. Instinct negotiates with opportunism. Migration becomes settlement. Above ancient seasonal rhythms and inscrutable connectivities, life skits about like a cursor on a ouija board, guided by chance and exuberant inventiveness as much as deep-rooted imperatives. And especially so in spring. Gretel Ehrlich, gazing over the Wyoming Hills at flocks of migrating finches, falls of hail, crashings of orchard branches, concluded that in spring, "the general law of increasing disorder is on the take".

I get disorderly and fidgety, too, after the months of rutted inertia, and wait for that day in early March when there is a kind of pre-spring overture, when the light seems to open out, lose the brittle clarity of winter sunshine and dust the leafless landscape with the merest hint of pollen. It happened on 2 March this year and, guessing where the action would be, I sped to the vast liminal marshlands of north Norfolk. The atmosphere on the coast was electric. The sky was full of jitterbugging birds, windblown flurries of lapwing, chattering, cantankerous mobs of brent geese, flocks of golden plover, invisible until they turned in synchrony and the sun tinselled the undersides of their wings. I soon saw one reason for their restlessness. A juvenile peregrine falcon, driven by rapacious instincts, adolescent hormones and sheer devilment, was repeatedly scything at 150mph through a shape-shifting plume of starlings--and missing every time. But I sensed another thrill running through the masses of birds. They were poised for their journey home, back to the northern tundra.

Do we still have this restless itch to move on somewhere deep in our own biology? We're touched by migration, bird migration especially, more than can be explained by the simple associations it has with the new seasons. The pioneering US nature writer Aldo Leopold envisioned the migration of geese as a kind of eco-poetic commerce, the corn of the midwest combining with the light of the tundra to generate "as net profit a wild poem dropped from the murky skies upon the muds of March". Do the airy, swooping flights of swallows and other summer migrants from Africa, so different from the movements of northern birds, sound faint cultural--maybe even genetic--echoes of that warm southern landscape from which the first nomadic humans emerged? Most of these annual visitors are in alarming and inexplicable decline, and we can have no idea of what we may lose if that link with our origins finally vanishes.

In the summer of 2010, just a few miles east of where I watched the peregrine, archaeologists discovered the oldest evidence yet of human occupation in Britain, a cache of flint tools probably 900,000 years old. They identified the likely makers as Homo antecessor, a group of nomadic hunter-gatherers who had risked the journey up from the continent to what was probably the northernmost habitable part of the European land mass. …

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