Here Are Regulations That Should Be Cut

The Florida Times Union, April 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Here Are Regulations That Should Be Cut


Gov. Rick Scott is asking people for examples of state government regulations that should be repealed.

Are there regulations that are confusing, contradictory and inefficient?

In a meeting with the Times-Union editorial board, the governor said he is looking for examples. So we offered the usage of members of our Email Interactive Group.

The Times-Union's view is that many well-intended rules have unintended consequences. Many rules can be written more effectively to protect the free market and consumers.

For more examples from the readers, go to our Opinion Page Blog: jacksonville.com/opinion. And to send us more suggestions, just send an email: mike.clark@jacksonville.com.

CHANGE SCHOOL START DATE

I would like to see repeal of the law that set the mandatory start date for schools in Florida to not earlier than two weeks prior to Labor Day. My family used to love getting out of school prior to Memorial Day and visiting our state.

This allowed us to see many attractions with reduced crowds and encouraged us to spend our money here. Since this law we have vacationed out of state each year, when prior to this we had stayed in state for six consecutive years.

Craig Maheu, St. Johns

SCRAP SUNSHINE LAW

This may not qualify as a "regulation," but I believe the Sunshine Law should be repealed. Jacksonville, for example, has 19 elected council members. It is counter productive for these officials not to be able to communicate with each other about the details of specific issues.

James M. "Jim" Barker IV, Jacksonville

LOOK AT COSTS

If it costs my household more money to enforce the regulation, then I am not in favor of it. Smaller government governs best! Keep it simple, and let men decide for themselves. Personal responsibility is the key to less regulation.

Sabrina Wheeler, Jacksonville

PROTECT CONSUMERS

A cut in regulations is what costs taxpayers hundreds of billions in bailouts. Regulation not only protects consumers but capitalism itself from collapsing under its own weight.

My guess is people living downstream have a different perspective than those living upstream.

Charles Hill, St. Simons Island, Ga.

REVIEW THEM REGULARLY

All regulatory ordinances, rules, regulations and laws should have a sunset provision and require that some objective standards be met in order to be continued.

If those objectives, either monetary or environmental, are not met, then the law shall be deemed unsuccessful and shall expire. This would also serve to keep our legislators busy with reviewing old laws and keep them from doing more harm by passing even more laws. …

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