War on Fossil Fuels Continues; 'Crucify' Comment Wasn't Just Poor Choice of Words, but Obama Policy

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

War on Fossil Fuels Continues; 'Crucify' Comment Wasn't Just Poor Choice of Words, but Obama Policy


Byline: Charles T. Drevna, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The April 30 resignation of Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Al Armendariz after he was caught telling the truth - that he wants to crucify companies he claims don't comply with environmental laws - will do nothing to slow the Obama administration's senseless war on fossil fuels. Mr. Armendariz, the top EPA official for Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas, said in a 2010 videotaped speech, which attracted notice only a few days ago, that he once told his staff about his philosophy of enforcement by using what he called a crude analogy.

It was kind of like how the Romans used to, you know, conquer villages in the Mediterranean, Mr. Armendariz said in the video. They'd go into a little Turkish town somewhere, they'd find the first five guys they saw, and they'd crucify them. And then, you know, that town was really easy to manage for the next few years.

Mr. Armendariz said, You make examples out of people who are, in this case, not complying with the law .. and you hit them as hard as you can to act as a deterrent to others

Those are certainly inflammatory words, and it's understandable that Mr. Armendariz resigned after his 2-year-old comments drew criticism from both Republicans and Democrats. Even EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson said Mr. Armendariz's belated apology was warranted and that his comments were disappointing.

But the most important issue that the Armendariz speech raises shouldn't be his poor choice of words. It should be the Obama administration's poor choice of policies supporting a war on fossil fuels that is hurting American consumers, America's workers, America's economy and America's national security.

Mr. Armendariz accurately and candidly described the EPA's war on fossil fuels. He had to backpedal after his remarks were broadcast, but President Obama and the EPA aren't backpedaling on the policies that Mr. Armendariz carried out and defended.

The anti-fossil-fuels policies of the Obama administration demonize the proven, reliable and efficient petroleum fuels and petrochemicals that keep America moving and make modern life possible. The extraction of oil and natural gas and the manufacture of fuels and petrochemicals support more than 9 million American jobs, generate more than $31 billion a year in federal taxes and protect national security.

Unfortunately, Mr. Obama has pursued a policy of overregulation that brings little or no environmental benefit and continually tries to raise energy taxes on oil and refined petroleum products, natural gas and coal to increase the costs of fossil fuels. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

War on Fossil Fuels Continues; 'Crucify' Comment Wasn't Just Poor Choice of Words, but Obama Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.