Labor Bosses Demand Their Dues; Preserving Rank-and-File Numbers Is Key to Wealth and Power

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

Labor Bosses Demand Their Dues; Preserving Rank-and-File Numbers Is Key to Wealth and Power


Byline: Matt Patterson and Trey Kovacs, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude .. shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction

- United States Constitution, 13th Amendment

Labor bosses are fighting to keep peo- ple in unions against their will, forcibly collecting dues from unwilling members and using those dues to line their own pockets. In effect, labor leaders have imposed their own system of involuntary servitude on recalcitrant union members.

In California, for example, Service Employees International Union (SEIU) bosses in Fresno are engaged in a war to keep disgruntled members from defecting. Worker disenchantment with SEIU representation began in January, when Fresno County officials were forced to cut public workers' wages by 9 percent in light of the government's dire financial straits. Outraged SEIU bigwigs reacted in typical fashion by calling for a three-day strike.

But rank-and-file SEIU members were less than eager to blame county officials for trying to right the government's sinking fiscal ship. Union workers realized a return to financial stability required a shared sacrifice and took a dim view of their union bosses' petulant agitations. Before long, Fresno County workers began to seek decertification from SEIU.

For their part, Fresno correctional officers created another union and petitioned for a union election. Eulalio Gomez, president of the newly created Fresno Sheriff's Correctional Officers Association, commented on his group's decision to cut ties with SEIU: I have an issue with a union telling you to go on strike in today's double-digit unemployment. One out of five people are not working here. We have people in a lot of financial distress, and they're out here with their whistles and their picket signs, doing what?

Fresno Department of Social Services workers also have petitioned for a decertification vote from SEIU.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Labor Bosses Demand Their Dues; Preserving Rank-and-File Numbers Is Key to Wealth and Power
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.