Big Apple Science Idea Spreads to Europe

By Blau, John | Research-Technology Management, May-June 2012 | Go to article overview

Big Apple Science Idea Spreads to Europe


Blau, John, Research-Technology Management


A high-tech idea hatched in New York City has found an offshoot in the United Kingdom and could sprout up in other European countries. With the help of international partners and British universities, U.K. Science Minister David Willetts aims to establish a new type of privately funded postgraduate university dedicated solely to science and technology-similar to one taking shape in the Big Apple.

Last year, New York invited universities from around the world to bid in a competition to build a campus dedicated to applied science. The competition stemmed from a concern that the city was falling behind knowledge hubs that have emerged around universities in Boston and Silicon Valley, missing out on opportunities to create jobs in nascent digital industries. Earlier this year, city officials selected the winning bid; Cornell University and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology will collaborate to establish a new science campus on Roosevelt Island.

The push to nurture cutting-edge research in New York and possibly soon in some large British city comes against a background of increasing globalization and international competition in higher education, along with growing demands for greater collaboration with business. The move in the United Kingdom could also tackle a problem that has long plagued British universities: while they are good at generating ideas, they are not as good as their U.S. counterparts at exploiting them to generate new businesses, jobs, and wealth.

It's a dilemma highlighted in the fortune and fate of two well-known science teams: the one, now history, made up of former Stanford University computer science students Sergey Brin and Larry Page, whose talents were discovered and supported by the founder of Sun Microsystems and who later launched Google; and the other, the Manchester University scientists Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov, who identified a new form of carbon called graphene, but--despite a Nobel Prize-never saw investments follow their discovery.

Willetts, who sees a privately funded science university as an opportunity to overcome this dilemma, is urging U.K. universities to look outside the country for support. "The next round of new institutions may well link existing British universities with international partners," he said just weeks after the winner of the U.S. competition was announced. "This time, we will be looking to private finance and perhaps sponsorship from some of the businesses that are keen to recruit more British graduates." Under proposed changes to the U.K.'s higher education system, it will become easier for overseas institutions to set up in the country, in much the same way that an increasing number of U.K. and U.S. universities have established campuses overseas.

Willetts's proposal for a "new kind of dedicated science university" that taps businesses for money and pulls in international partners for expertise has generated plenty of discussion--and no small amount of skepticism--from experts in the United Kingdom and across Europe. University of Warwick Vice Chancellor Nigel Thrift says he is definitely interested in the idea. His university was the only British institution to reach the finalist list for the New York competition. Thrift's counterpart at Cranfield University, John O'Reilly, believes the idea underscores the importance of linking research and innovation in business with postgraduate teaching.

Others are less convinced. Kieron Flanagan from the University of Manchester, for instance, questions whether business would be willing to invest in science campuses that are unlikely to generate profits.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Big Apple Science Idea Spreads to Europe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.