Apartment Therapy

By Dana, Rebecca | Newsweek, May 21, 2012 | Go to article overview

Apartment Therapy


Dana, Rebecca, Newsweek


Byline: Rebecca Dana

'Wellness real estate' for the green 1 percent.

Terry McAuliffe, Deepak Chopra, Dick Gephardt, Dr. Oz, and a team of scientists from Columbia University walk into a luxury Manhattan apartment building.?.?.

Sounds like the setup to a joke. Actually, it's Delos, the organization behind an ultrapricey futuristic condominium development in Greenwich Village that will be completed by the end of this year. All these luminaries have been part of the project.

The building's amenities make the Jetsons look Amish. Delos pumps vitamin C and aloe into its shower water. It has "posture-supportive" and "heat-reflexology" flooring, to keep you standing up straight, and lighting designed to sync with your circadian rhythms. It has a "wellness concierge," who will manage all your yoga and acupuncture needs. It's possible that other apartment buildings offer "sleep gardens," electromagnetic-free zones, and personalized aromatherapy floated in through the air vents, but certainly none can claim an exclusive partnership with a sleep center at the Cleveland Clinic. Such amenities don't come cheap. The 8,000-square-foot duplex penthouse, which boasts its own 3,000-square-foot roof deck and solarium, is expected to fetch $40 million.

How did the former stars of the Democratic Party come together with a gaggle of spiritual gurus to create a place where the super-rich can breathe specially- scented air? The man behind Delos is Morad Fareed, a member of the Clinton Global Initiative, which is not where most people in high-end Manhattan real-estate development come from. Fareed, who made his bones at Goldman Sachs, is a proponent of "altruistic capitalism." His big idea, branded "wellness real estate," is to take green architecture's concern with sustainability and apply it to the inhabitants. "Why stop at building homes that are good for just the environment? …

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